High intensity landing light

We received a letter from Cirrus asking us to decide on the final options. One of the options listed was a high intensity landing light for $1000. Does anyone have any comments about the value versus cost of this option.

I know there might be some reference in the forum but I couldn’t figure out how to search for “landing light” with out getting every occurance of “landing” or “light”.

We received a letter from Cirrus asking us to decide on the final options. One of the options listed was a high intensity landing light for $1000. Does anyone have any comments about the value versus cost of this option.

Well, at the basic level, I suspect that it would take awhile to amortize the cost of having the regular kind replaced regularly (though by the time you add the cost of flying your bird to the service center, it probably won’t take that long.)

However, the nice thing about the high intensity system is that you can leave it on all the time. Makes an excellent safety investment, probably much more cost-effective than, say, TCAD, and it’s supposed to repel birds as well (who knows…)

We received a letter from Cirrus asking us to decide on the final options. One of the options listed was a high intensity landing light for $1000. Does anyone have any comments about the value versus cost of this option.

Is the high intensity light standard on the SR22?

Gordon

We received a letter from Cirrus asking us to decide on the final options. One of the options listed was a high intensity landing light for $1000. Does anyone have any comments about the value versus cost of this option.

Art,

One point of reference may be to compare it to http://www.speedmods.com/boom_beam.htmLoPresti’s Boom Beam. This is a very similar high-intensity light kit, STCed for Bonanzas and Mooneys.

According to Apr 2000 http://www.aopa.org/members/files/pilot/2000/prod0004.html#boombeamAOPA Pilot, the Boom Bean is $699, with an extra $135 for the Mooney installation kit. One would also assume additional charge for installation labor. So it is in the same ballpark as the $1000 kit from Cirrus.

Lopresti offers a 5-year warranty, including bulb burnout. You’d have to check whether the Cirrus light kit carries a similar warranty.

Another point of reference is to compare the cost of the kit vs. the cost of replacing conventional landing lights. A replacement bulb costs approx. $100 from Cirrus, though I’ve also seen them at parts suppliers for as low as $68. So it would only take 10-15 bulbs before you’d reach the cost of the high-intensity one.

Will you go through 10-15 bulbs within 5 years or so? Who knows… Reported landing light life on this forum seems very variable, from 10 hours to 150+. CD also mentioned that even without the high-intensity light, they are changing the landing light mount, so perhaps even the normal lights will last much longer now.

(Of course, from what I’ve heard, the high-intensity light is much brighter – so that’s an additional benefit – maybe it’ll give you a better chance of seeing the deer that always seem to be running around GAI just after dusk!!)

Steve

Off Topic, but the XENON-WHITE headlight is available for your car or truck, and it can be installed by just changing the bulb. I wanted the new XENON-WHITE light for our older cars, but the dealers said it would cost over a thousand to convert, or I would have to buy the new cars that come with it. A few days later, I found the following Link and ordered the lights. As I recall. They were less than $20 for our Ford and BMW. Just pop them in and you have the new Xenon-White lights. Very easy to do.

WWW.STREETGLOW.COM

(DonÂ’t let your kids see this Webster, as they have the under car neonÂ’s also.)

Denis

Well, at the basic level, I suspect that it would take awhile to amortize the cost of having the regular kind replaced regularly (though by the time you add the cost of flying your bird to the service center, it probably won’t take that long.)

Dave,

Agreed with all you said… just one minor point – in case you or others are taking flying your planes to a service center for landing light replacement… I believe owner/operators with PPL and above are allowed to change landing light bulbs without an A&P signoff, according to FAR 43, Appendix A, para ©(17).

So you just need to order an extra light or two so that you have them available for swapping if necessary. I carry two landing lights in my baggage compartment just in case!

Steve

Dave,

Is the light noticeably brighter over standard lights on your night landings?

We received a letter from Cirrus asking us to decide on the final options. One of the options listed was a high intensity landing light for $1000. Does anyone have any comments about the value versus cost of this option.

Well, at the basic level, I suspect that it would take awhile to amortize the cost of having the regular kind replaced regularly (though by the time you add the cost of flying your bird to the service center, it probably won’t take that long.)

However, the nice thing about the high intensity system is that you can leave it on all the time. Makes an excellent safety investment, probably much more cost-effective than, say, TCAD, and it’s supposed to repel birds as well (who knows…)

We received a letter from Cirrus asking us to decide on the final options. One of the options listed was a high intensity landing light for $1000. Does anyone have any comments about the value versus cost of this option.

Well, at the basic level, I suspect that it would take awhile to amortize the cost of having the regular kind replaced regularly (though by the time you add the cost of flying your bird to the service center, it probably won’t take that long.)

However, the nice thing about the high intensity system is that you can leave it on all the time. Makes an excellent safety investment, probably much more cost-effective than, say, TCAD, and it’s supposed to repel birds as well (who knows…)

Wise man.

Well, at the basic level, I suspect that it would take awhile to amortize the cost of having the regular kind replaced regularly (though by the time you add the cost of flying your bird to the service center, it probably won’t take that long.)

Dave,

Agreed with all you said… just one minor point – in case you or others are taking flying your planes to a service center for landing light replacement… I believe owner/operators with PPL and above are allowed to change landing light bulbs without an A&P signoff, according to FAR 43, Appendix A, para ©(17).

So you just need to order an extra light or two so that you have them available for swapping if necessary. I carry two landing lights in my baggage compartment just in case!

Steve

Steve, I don’t think you can just swap the Moon Beam with a standard light. I THINK I was told it requires a special power source (black box) and a special bracket. I tried to get it done on my Trinidad a few months before I took delivery of my SR22 and was told it was not that easy. Check with your A/P first.

Denis

Well, at the basic level, I suspect that it would take awhile to amortize the cost of having the regular kind replaced regularly (though by the time you add the cost of flying your bird to the service center, it probably won’t take that long.)

Dave,

Agreed with all you said… just one minor point – in case you or others are taking flying your planes to a service center for landing light replacement… I believe owner/operators with PPL and above are allowed to change landing light bulbs without an A&P signoff, according to FAR 43, Appendix A, para ©(17).

So you just need to order an extra light or two so that you have them available for swapping if necessary. I carry two landing lights in my baggage compartment just in case!

Steve

Steve, I don’t think you can just swap the Moon Beam with a standard light. I THINK I was told it requires a special power source (black box) and a special bracket. I tried to get it done on my Trinidad a few months before I took delivery of my SR22 and was told it was not that easy. Check with your A/P first.

Denis

Denis,

You are correct; the boom beam qualifies as a major alteration that can’t be done except by an A&P… I thought that Gary made a comment about having to fly to the service center to get the (regular, frequently burned out) lights changed - and I was trying to save people some trips… If that’s not what he meant, I just misunderstood! But as you say, you would definitely need an A&P to do the boom beam conversion…

Steve

You are correct; the boom beam qualifies as a major alteration that can’t be done except by an A&P… I thought that Gary made a comment about having to fly to the service center to get the (regular, frequently burned out) lights changed - and I was trying to save people some trips… If that’s not what he meant, I just misunderstood! But as you say, you would definitely need an A&P to do the boom beam conversion…

Actually it was I that talked about going to the service center. I know that it’s neither hard nor illegal to replace your own landing light (four years of C172 ownership will do that to a guy, though turning it sideways seemed to help a lot) but thought I’d present the best case scenario.

In any case, I think it’s worth the money overall, even if you replace your own landing lights.

Dave,

Is the light noticeably brighter over standard lights on your night landings?

I can’t really do them side-by-side to find out, but it seems seriously bright. The beam is a bit different shape too, sort of oblong if I recall (I haven’t done too many night landings yet in the 22.)

It can’t help be a whole lot brighter, since it doesn’t shine through the prop, and it isn’t half-covered with tape to reduce the glare on the back of the prop.

Gordon,

Yes, it is standard on the SR22. Like Dave Katz, I leave it on most the time. It take very little power, 3 AMPs, as I recall. I think it is supposed to be six times brighter than the standard light.

Rob

Is the high intensity light standard on the SR22?

Gordon

We received a letter from Cirrus asking us to decide on the final options. One of the options listed was a high intensity landing light for $1000. Does anyone have any comments about the value versus cost of this option.

Art,

One point of reference may be to compare it to http://www.speedmods.com/boom_beam.htmLoPresti’s Boom Beam. This is a very similar high-intensity light kit, STCed for Bonanzas and Mooneys.

According to Apr 2000 http://www.aopa.org/members/files/pilot/2000/prod0004.html#boombeamAOPA Pilot, the Boom Bean is $699, with an extra $135 for the Mooney installation kit. One would also assume additional charge for installation labor. So it is in the same ballpark as the $1000 kit from Cirrus.

Lopresti offers a 5-year warranty, including bulb burnout. You’d have to check whether the Cirrus light kit carries a similar warranty.

Another point of reference is to compare the cost of the kit vs. the cost of replacing conventional landing lights. A replacement bulb costs approx. $100 from Cirrus, though I’ve also seen them at parts suppliers for as low as $68. So it would only take 10-15 bulbs before you’d reach the cost of the high-intensity one.

Steve,

Who are the suppliers with the $68 lights? Do you have a part number?

Stuart

Will you go through 10-15 bulbs within 5 years or so? Who knows… Reported landing light life on this forum seems very variable, from 10 hours to 150+. CD also mentioned that even without the high-intensity light, they are changing the landing light mount, so perhaps even the normal lights will last much longer now.

(Of course, from what I’ve heard, the high-intensity light is much brighter – so that’s an additional benefit – maybe it’ll give you a better chance of seeing the deer that always seem to be running around GAI just after dusk!!)

Steve

A replacement bulb costs approx. $100 from Cirrus, though I’ve also seen them at parts suppliers for as low as $68

It would be interesting to see how much an identical bulb costs in an auto parts store. Of course, without an STC it wouldn’t be nearly as good!

Steve, funny story… When I picked up my SR22 last month, the first stop I made was to LoPresti’s to get the Moon Beam installed. I had not made a night landing at that time, but I knew Roy LoPriesti well and always planned to get his light. Roy came out to look at the light and said, Denis, you got it already!"

Get the new landing light Steve. It is the SAME as the LoPresti’s Boom Beam according to Roy LoPresti. There is only manufacture of this landing light. It is 10 times more brighter than what I had on my Trinidad. After making many night landings since then, I love it.

Get GPSS also. Denis

We received a letter from Cirrus asking us to decide on the final options. One of the options listed was a high intensity landing light for $1000. Does anyone have any comments about the value versus cost of this option.

Art,

One point of reference may be to compare it to http://www.speedmods.com/boom_beam.htmLoPresti’s Boom Beam. This is a very similar high-intensity light kit, STCed for Bonanzas and Mooneys.

According to Apr 2000 http://www.aopa.org/members/files/pilot/2000/prod0004.html#boombeamAOPA Pilot, the Boom Bean is $699, with an extra $135 for the Mooney installation kit. One would also assume additional charge for installation labor. So it is in the same ballpark as the $1000 kit from Cirrus.

Lopresti offers a 5-year warranty, including bulb burnout. You’d have to check whether the Cirrus light kit carries a similar warranty.

Another point of reference is to compare the cost of the kit vs. the cost of replacing conventional landing lights. A replacement bulb costs approx. $100 from Cirrus, though I’ve also seen them at parts suppliers for as low as $68. So it would only take 10-15 bulbs before you’d reach the cost of the high-intensity one.

Will you go through 10-15 bulbs within 5 years or so? Who knows… Reported landing light life on this forum seems very variable, from 10 hours to 150+. CD also mentioned that even without the high-intensity light, they are changing the landing light mount, so perhaps even the normal lights will last much longer now.

(Of course, from what I’ve heard, the high-intensity light is much brighter – so that’s an additional benefit – maybe it’ll give you a better chance of seeing the deer that always seem to be running around GAI just after dusk!!)

Steve

This could be the light/ they are using on the Cirrus. I found it on a Sylvania website. It IS expensive!

Denis

http://orderxenarc.sylvania.com/orderxenarc/productenlarged.asp?ProductId=141941&CId={F4054CC7-E8ED-44D6-A37E-7DB15971D4DD}&NC=88200111366

Denis

We received a letter from Cirrus asking us to decide on the final options. One of the options listed was a high intensity landing light for $1000. Does anyone have any comments about the value versus cost of this option.

Art,

One point of reference may be to compare it to http://www.speedmods.com/boom_beam.htmLoPresti’s Boom Beam. This is a very similar high-intensity light kit, STCed for Bonanzas and Mooneys.

According to Apr 2000 http://www.aopa.org/members/files/pilot/2000/prod0004.html#boombeamAOPA Pilot, the Boom Bean is $699, with an extra $135 for the Mooney installation kit. One would also assume additional charge for installation labor. So it is in the same ballpark as the $1000 kit from Cirrus.

Lopresti offers a 5-year warranty, including bulb burnout. You’d have to check whether the Cirrus light kit carries a similar warranty.

Another point of reference is to compare the cost of the kit vs. the cost of replacing conventional landing lights. A replacement bulb costs approx. $100 from Cirrus, though I’ve also seen them at parts suppliers for as low as $68. So it would only take 10-15 bulbs before you’d reach the cost of the high-intensity one.

Will you go through 10-15 bulbs within 5 years or so? Who knows… Reported landing light life on this forum seems very variable, from 10 hours to 150+. CD also mentioned that even without the high-intensity light, they are changing the landing light mount, so perhaps even the normal lights will last much longer now.

(Of course, from what I’ve heard, the high-intensity light is much brighter – so that’s an additional benefit – maybe it’ll give you a better chance of seeing the deer that always seem to be running around GAI just after dusk!!)

Steve

Steve,

Who are the suppliers with the $68 lights? Do you have a part number?

Stuart

Stuart,

The light on my SR20 is Whelen part number Q5596. You should probably double check yours to make sure it’s the same part. Not sure if SR22, later 20s, etc. use the same light.

I believe the supplier I got the $68 light from was http://www.aviall.comAviall.

I called Whelen (860-526-9504) and asked them for a list of several nationwide retailers (i.e. mail order folks, not local FBOs) and called a couple of them to see their prices; Aviall was the cheapest. But that was probably six months ago, so it might be worth checking again.

http://www.aircraftspruce.comAircraft Spruce and Specialty also sells them for $79. Just search for q5596.

Steve

Off Topic, but the XENON-WHITE headlight is available for your car or truck, and it can be installed by just changing the bulb. I wanted the new XENON-WHITE light for our older cars, but the dealers said it would cost over a thousand to convert, or I would have to buy the new cars that come with it. A few days later, I found the following Link and ordered the lights. As I recall. They were less than $20 for our Ford and BMW. Just pop them in and you have the new Xenon-White lights. Very easy to do.

Not quite Denis, you are talking about regular bulbs with a brighter and/or whiter light. As their name suggests they are supposed to be “xenon”-white, but beside the name there is nothing common to “high intensity discharge” (HID) lights. These are in fact way brighter, need a separate driver box and are used in newer high end autos. And they likely cost over a thousand.

That’s what is in the 22 and as an option in the 20. Go for it.

Wilfried

http://www.streetglow.com/site/auto6.htm

A better link…second item down.

Denis