Trustee Companies

Doing some forward planning

As the Cirrus is certified only on the US and Australian register, then for now most planes will be on the N register.

As a non-US Citzen/Resident (I live in Colorado) I can’t register a plane on the N register. I understand I need to hold it via a Trustee.

Can someone point me in the direction of a US company that offers this type of service for a reasonable price. The aviation lawyer I spoke to yesterday wanted $5500 to setup and $2000 per annum.

Thanks

Robert

As a non-US Citzen/Resident (I live in Colorado) I can’t register a plane on the N register. I understand I need to hold it via a Trustee.

Is this an actual provision of the law? What a nutso law if so! I knew that you had to be a US citizen to own broadcast stations (welcome to America, Citizen Murdoch!), and that you had to be native-born to run for President (odd in its own way, but it saved us Henry Kissinger). But registering an airplane??? Is this some holdover from the days when the GA fleet had to stand ready to be mobilized for war?

Seriously, is this a well-known law? I had never heard of it – though I would have guessed it was one of Pat Buchanan’s promises if he were elected president.

Robert,

I am looking at it as well for my Aug 2002 delivery, will send you by private email copy of a note I received from a well known company in Jersey, Channel Islands specialized in setting up trust for A/C. It’s probably easier to find this type of company in the US but you can still have a look at the note that gives you the to do and not to do about trustee company.

Jean Jacques

Doing some forward planning

As the Cirrus is certified only on the US and Australian register, then for now most planes will be on the N register.

As a non-US Citzen/Resident (I live in Colorado) I can’t register a plane on the N register. I understand I need to hold it via a Trustee.

Can someone point me in the direction of a US company that offers this type of service for a reasonable price. The aviation lawyer I spoke to yesterday wanted $5500 to setup and $2000 per annum.

Thanks

Robert

Doing some forward planning

As the Cirrus is certified only on the US and Australian register, then for now most planes will be on the N register.

As a non-US Citzen/Resident (I live in Colorado) I can’t register a plane on the N register. I understand I need to hold it via a Trustee.

Can someone point me in the direction of a US company that offers this type of service for a reasonable price. The aviation lawyer I spoke to yesterday wanted $5500 to setup and $2000 per annum.

Thanks

Robert

Robert,

try Aircraft Guranty Corporation, Mr. Connie L. Wood, 515 N. Sam Houston Parkway East, Suite 305, Houston, TX. 281-445-7594.

Also, doublecheck the law again: As long as your plane is NOT leaving the U.S., to my knowledge you may have it N-registered under your name. You wouls also qualify if you have a green card.

Timm

My aircraft is registered with a company run by an American living in the UK.

It is substansially cheaper than anyone else this side of the pond, approx. $500 p.a. including set up.

Southern Aircraft Consultancy

Tel. 44 1736 786 032

Robin Taylor

Is this an actual provision of the law? What a nutso law if so! I knew that you had to be a US citizen to own broadcast stations (welcome to America, Citizen Murdoch!), and that you had to be native-born to run for President (odd in its own way, but it saved us Henry Kissinger). But registering an airplane??? Is this some holdover from the days when the GA fleet had to stand ready to be mobilized for war?

Seems to be. I ran into this while establishing an LLC to own another airplane I hold with partners. One of the requirements is that at least two thirds of the LLCs managers are US Citizens, and that at least three quarters of the voting interest is held by US citizens (so that the registry does not become “a registry of convenience for non US citizens.”)

As a non-US Citzen/Resident (I live in Colorado) I can’t register a plane on the N register. I understand I need to hold it via a Trustee.

Is this an actual provision of the law? What a nutso law if so! I knew that you had to be a US citizen to own broadcast stations (welcome to America, Citizen Murdoch!), and that you had to be native-born to run for President (odd in its own way, but it saved us Henry Kissinger). But registering an airplane??? Is this some holdover from the days when the GA fleet had to stand ready to be mobilized for war?

Seriously, is this a well-known law? I had never heard of it – though I would have guessed it was one of Pat Buchanan’s promises if he were elected president.

The law is FAR 47, has nothing to do with wartimes. The problem comes from international use of planes. Example: If a German would register a plane under US-regulations (N-xxxx), then would fly the plane to, say Argentina, and use it there: Under which law would he be: German, American, or Argentine??? Would he be required to comply with ADs? Does he have to have annual inspections, or to comply with FAR 91? And if he would not comply, what agency would look after him? Here in Europe, we had a few very sad cases where planes were registered in the US, but no insurance was paid. Nobody was responsible for the damage.

The law says, and I believe this to be okay, that a plane may be registered to a) a US citizen, b) to a citizen who was lawfully admitted to the US for permanent residence, c) a corporation under US law, a trust under US law.

For myself, a German with no permanent residence in the US, registration via a trust is the way to go. It costs around US 2000 to register, plus 800 annually.

Timm Preusser #132

It’s not necessarily straightforward to see which rules apply but ICAO rules are there which define the ‘which rules apply’ question clearly.

It depends on the country you fly in, the registration country and the licenses the pilot holds. In general, the strongest of the various rules applies.

Chris

As a non-US Citzen/Resident (I live in Colorado) I can’t register a plane on the N register. I understand I need to hold it via a Trustee.

Is this an actual provision of the law? What a nutso law if so! I knew that you had to be a US citizen to own broadcast stations (welcome to America, Citizen Murdoch!), and that you had to be native-born to run for President (odd in its own way, but it saved us Henry Kissinger). But registering an airplane??? Is this some holdover from the days when the GA fleet had to stand ready to be mobilized for war?

Seriously, is this a well-known law? I had never heard of it – though I would have guessed it was one of Pat Buchanan’s promises if he were elected president.

The law is FAR 47, has nothing to do with wartimes. The problem comes from international use of planes. Example: If a German would register a plane under US-regulations (N-xxxx), then would fly the plane to, say Argentina, and use it there: Under which law would he be: German, American, or Argentine??? Would he be required to comply with ADs? Does he have to have annual inspections, or to comply with FAR 91? And if he would not comply, what agency would look after him? Here in Europe, we had a few very sad cases where planes were registered in the US, but no insurance was paid. Nobody was responsible for the damage.

The law says, and I believe this to be okay, that a plane may be registered to a) a US citizen, b) to a citizen who was lawfully admitted to the US for permanent residence, c) a corporation under US law, a trust under US law.

For myself, a German with no permanent residence in the US, registration via a trust is the way to go. It costs around US 2000 to register, plus 800 annually.

Timm Preusser #132