Stupid Question - cover straps

Okay, here’s a stupid question, but one that I thought I would ask anyway.

For those of you who have Bruce’s cover, where do you put the front-most strap?

At first I thought it would go nicely between the exhaust and the fuselage. But then I thought that if it slipped a little bit it would hit the transponder antenna and vents down there, plus it didn’t seem to fit too snugly.

Then I put it a little farther forward, on the “bulge” of the cowling, just ahead of the exhaust pipes. This seems to work well, but I’m worried about possible damage to the “bulges” with long term use of the cover (since I tend to pull the straps pretty tight).

Any suggestions?

Thanks!

Steve

Okay, here’s a stupid question, but one that I thought I would ask anyway.

For those of you who have Bruce’s cover, where do you put the front-most strap?

At first I thought it would go nicely between the exhaust and the fuselage. But then I thought that if it slipped a little bit it would hit the transponder antenna and vents down there, plus it didn’t seem to fit too snugly.

Then I put it a little farther forward, on the “bulge” of the cowling, just ahead of the exhaust pipes. This seems to work well, but I’m worried about possible damage to the “bulges” with long term use of the cover (since I tend to pull the straps pretty tight).

Oh yeah, one more question – I notice it says on the prop and POH not to push/pull the plane by the prop. But it’s pretty hard to move the plane around just by pulling on the tow bar. I’ve always used the props for pushing and pulling before, but this was on rental 172s and archers, so maybe I was inadvertantly doing damange, or else maybe with a fixed pitch prop it’s okay to move the plane that way.

But, short of getting a powered tug, and without using the prop, how are you guys moving the planes by yourself?

Thanks again

Steve

The main problem with using the tow bar is that it is spring held not lever.

I have meant for a year now to mount a lever mechanism on the same posts that hold the spring.

It can’t take much of a side load at all without popping off.

Pieces of hose tight on the handle would help the grips. They’re a little small.

If you have trouble directing the aircraft backing up (tricky with that nose gear) just pull it forward a foot or two to line it up then push back again.

Pushups, lots of pushups.

Okay, here’s a stupid question, but one that I thought I would ask anyway.

For those of you who have Bruce’s cover, where do you put the front-most strap?

At first I thought it would go nicely between the exhaust and the fuselage. But then I thought that if it slipped a little bit it would hit the transponder antenna and vents down there, plus it didn’t seem to fit too snugly.

Then I put it a little farther forward, on the “bulge” of the cowling, just ahead of the exhaust pipes. This seems to work well, but I’m worried about possible damage to the “bulges” with long term use of the cover (since I tend to pull the straps pretty tight).

Oh yeah, one more question – I notice it says on the prop and POH not to push/pull the plane by the prop. But it’s pretty hard to move the plane around just by pulling on the tow bar. I’ve always used the props for pushing and pulling before, but this was on rental 172s and archers, so maybe I was inadvertantly doing damange, or else maybe with a fixed pitch prop it’s okay to move the plane that way.

But, short of getting a powered tug, and without using the prop, how are you guys moving the planes by yourself?

Thanks again

Steve

The main problem with using the tow bar is that it is spring held not lever.

Doug,

What is spring held?

Can you explain what you are talking about? Is this an upgrade that Cirrus should incoporate?

Tom

I have meant for a year now to mount a lever mechanism on the same posts that hold the spring.

It can’t take much of a side load at all without popping off.

Pieces of hose tight on the handle would help the grips. They’re a little small.

If you have trouble directing the aircraft backing up (tricky with that nose gear) just pull it forward a foot or two to line it up then push back again.

Pushups, lots of pushups.

The main problem with using the tow bar is that it is spring held not lever.

Doug,

What is spring held?

Can you explain what you are talking about? Is this an upgrade that Cirrus should incoporate?

Tom,

Picture the type of tow bar used for Cessnas (not ones used on cherokees, for example). You know how it’s like a U-shape and there little holes at the end of the U which slip onto bolts on the nosewheel? Well the towbar that comes with the SR20 uses a spring to keep tension on that portion of the towbar, so you have to fight against the spring to separate the “forks” of the U and then the spring holds it tightly onto the bolts on the nosewheel. Some towbars use a lever-action thing which positively locks the towbar onto the bolts on the nosewheel, rather than the springs.

my towbar is still pretty new, but my experience has shown that the spring is plenty strong enough - it doesn’t slip off at all. I just need to do more of the pushups Doug suggested in order to push the plane back. :slight_smile: I think the one shipped with the SR20 is adequate, and I’m sure it wouldn’t be too hard to find an alternative if you really wanted one.

Reading back on what I just typed it doesn’t seem very clear, but hopefully it’s enough to give you the idea.

Steve

Reading back on what I just typed it doesn’t seem very clear, but hopefully it’s enough to give you the idea.

Steve

Nope, that was perfectly clear :slight_smile:

Thanks, Steve, I had no idea what Doug was talking about.

(

my towbar is still pretty new, but my experience has shown that the spring is plenty strong enough - it doesn’t slip off at all.

I’ve actually not found this - trying to push the plane back with the towbar easily results in it slipping off - conversely the spring is strong enough to make getting the towbar on and off the noswheel a little tricky - the end result is usually some paint taken off the spat.

I would much prefer to use a towbar with an over-center lock - it would be easier to get on and off and easier to push with (pulling is fine).

Oh, and it’s not push-ups you need to do - it’s squats! Use your legs!

If you have a second person they can push on the front of the wing root, makes it much easier to push up a slope into the hangar etc.

Keep the tires fully inflated. My tires didn’t look low, but when I checked them they were below specs. Fully inflated tires make it much easier to push 163CD around. By the way, I found an inexpensive electric air pump at Kragan that I can attach without removing the wheel pants.

my towbar is still pretty new, but my experience has shown that the spring is plenty strong enough - it doesn’t slip off at all.

I’ve actually not found this - trying to push the plane back with the towbar easily results in it slipping off - conversely the spring is strong enough to make getting the towbar on and off the noswheel a little tricky - the end result is usually some paint taken off the spat.

I would much prefer to use a towbar with an over-center lock - it would be easier to get on and off and easier to push with (pulling is fine).

Oh, and it’s not push-ups you need to do - it’s squats! Use your legs!

If you have a second person they can push on the front of the wing root, makes it much easier to push up a slope into the hangar etc.

Keep the tires fully inflated. My tires didn’t look low, but when I checked them they were below specs. Fully inflated tires make it much easier to push 163CD around. By the way, I found an inexpensive electric air pump at Kragan that I can attach without removing the wheel pants.

my towbar is still pretty new, but my experience has shown that the spring is plenty strong enough - it doesn’t slip off at all.

I’ve actually not found this - trying to push the plane back with the towbar easily results in it slipping off - conversely the spring is strong enough to make getting the towbar on and off the noswheel a little tricky - the end result is usually some paint taken off the spat.

I would much prefer to use a towbar with an over-center lock - it would be easier to get on and off and easier to push with (pulling is fine).

Oh, and it’s not push-ups you need to do - it’s squats! Use your legs!

If you have a second person they can push on the front of the wing root, makes it much easier to push up a slope into the hangar etc.

Bill, can you provide any more details on the air pump such as make and model? What’s Kragan?
Thanks, Stuart

Keep the tires fully inflated. My tires didn’t look low, but when I checked them they were below specs. Fully inflated tires make it much easier to push 163CD around. By the way, I found an inexpensive electric air pump at Kragan that I can attach without removing the wheel pants.

my towbar is still pretty new, but my experience has shown that the spring is plenty strong enough - it doesn’t slip off at all.

I’ve actually not found this - trying to push the plane back with the towbar easily results in it slipping off - conversely the spring is strong enough to make getting the towbar on and off the noswheel a little tricky - the end result is usually some paint taken off the spat.

I would much prefer to use a towbar with an over-center lock - it would be easier to get on and off and easier to push with (pulling is fine).

Oh, and it’s not push-ups you need to do - it’s squats! Use your legs!

If you have a second person they can push on the front of the wing root, makes it much easier to push up a slope into the hangar etc.

Bill, can you provide any more details on the air pump such as make and model? What’s Kragan?
Thanks, Stuart

Kragan is an auto supply store. I’ll check the name of the pump when next time I’m at the hangar. The wx is lt rain with some convective activity today, so I’m not flying.

Bill

The pump I use is an AC DELCO 12 volt Automotic Air with dial in pressure. I stick the valve up under the wheel pant and work it into place with my index finger through the access hole. The valve stem on the tire needs to be lined up just right; it takes a little work but it is way easier than removing the wheel pants.

Bill

Keep the tires fully inflated. My tires didn’t look low, but when I checked them they were below specs. Fully inflated tires make it much easier to push 163CD around. By the way, I found an inexpensive electric air pump at Kragan that I can attach without removing the wheel pants.

my towbar is still pretty new, but my experience has shown that the spring is plenty strong enough - it doesn’t slip off at all.

I’ve actually not found this - trying to push the plane back with the towbar easily results in it slipping off - conversely the spring is strong enough to make getting the towbar on and off the noswheel a little tricky - the end result is usually some paint taken off the spat.

I would much prefer to use a towbar with an over-center lock - it would be easier to get on and off and easier to push with (pulling is fine).

Oh, and it’s not push-ups you need to do - it’s squats! Use your legs!

If you have a second person they can push on the front of the wing root, makes it much easier to push up a slope into the hangar etc.

Bill, can you provide any more details on the air pump such as make and model? What’s Kragan?
Thanks, Stuart

Kragan is an auto supply store. I’ll check the name of the pump when next time I’m at the hangar. The wx is lt rain with some convective activity today, so I’m not flying.

Bill