SRV don't see too many

Just took a demo flight in the SR22, eventhough I was interested in the SR 20 or even more, the SRV, (not IFR rated). I don’t see too many of the SRV’s around, so I ws wondering how owners liked or disliked them. Should I just go for the SR20 anyway.

Buy a 20 at the minimum, or better yet, do what I did. Buy a 20 get and instrument rating and then step up to a 22, or just get a 22 and get instrument rated in it. There is no market for an SRV when you want to resell it. It took almost a month to sell my SR-20.

In reply to:


Just took a demo flight in the SR22, eventhough I was interested in the SR 20 or even more, the SRV, (not IFR rated). I don’t see too many of the SRV’s around, so I ws wondering how owners liked or disliked them. Should I just go for the SR20 anyway.


uhhhh YEAH! How would you justify spending $180k or so on an SRV that can only be flown on a VFR day? You have deminished resale value of course as you have to find someone else that is also willing to justify that big sum of money for VFR only.

Secondly, what would you do if you decide to get and instrument rating? (which you should do). Without an IR, there is NO utility to the aircraft. You can NEVER plan on going anywhere at all. You can basically take it out for an afternoon once you check the weather that morning. You can not plan a week ahead because the weather changes. Get the 20 and get an instrument rating, you will be the happier.

Rick

In reply to:


Just took a demo flight in the SR22, eventhough I was interested in the SR 20 or even more, the SRV, (not IFR rated). I don’t see too many of the SRV’s around, so I ws wondering how owners liked or disliked them. Should I just go for the SR20 anyway.


I own and SRv N936CD s/n 1337. I love it. I am instrument rated, but see no reason to fly IFR. I have flown back to the Cirrus Migration from my home base in Phoenix twice and I have flown to Oshkosh twice as well. The SRv worked fine.

If you add the Cross Country package you essentially have an IFR plane lacking only the second alternator which you can have installed. And a backup attitude indicator.

A second NavCom can be added for $6,000 and the Sporty’s Attitude indicator is less than $1,600 and can be installed exactly where the one in the SR20/22 is located for less than $1,000. You now have an SR20 with all of the funcionality for about $12,000. That’s a lot less than and SR20.

I’m pleased to read about the great resale of the SR20’s, however it doesn’t seem to matter because I’m so happy with my SR20G2 that I don’t plan to sell it for a long time. I do not normally carry a lot of weight, fly over mountains, or fly long distances, so the SR20G2 has been great ‘for the money’. Don’t get me wrong, I flew the SR22 and LOVED it. I use the IFR part, but agree that VFR might fit your style. You will have to consider lots of different factors and I hope you get a Cirrus soon?
Good Luck

In reply to:


Buy a 20 at the minimum, or better yet, do what I did. Buy a 20 get and instrument rating and then step up to a 22, or just get a 22 and get instrument rated in it. There is no market for an SRV when you want to resell it. It took almost a month to sell my SR-20.


Jim,

A month? That’s not long! From everything I read and hear about the SR20 market, it moves quicker than the SR22 market - precisely because there are fewer of them out there. Another indicator - used SR20s are selling at a much higher percentage of new price than used SR22s of similar age. Nope - I believe that with all the used SR22s out there, the “low end” models will be snapped up like hot cakes!

  • Mike.

In reply to:


Without an IR, there is NO utility to the aircraft. You can NEVER plan on going anywhere at all. You can basically take it out for an afternoon once you check the weather that morning.


This is a flat-out stupidly untruthful statement. I am instrument rated and have logged over 280 flight hours in the last year, encompassing flights all over the eastern half of the country, from Canada to Mexico, Texas to Maine. My average flight leg time was 3 hours +/- 1 hour, or approximately 400 nm legs). All of the flights were flown at or below 10,500 ft msl. Of the more than 280 flight hours, only 32 hours were flown in IMC conditions, and 4 of that 32 were training flights where my instructor and I specifically selected IMC conditions days instead of faking it with foggles. I only cancelled two flights in that time due to WX. Both of those were flights that would have had to pass through extensive bands of active convective activity and so I would not have flown them even under IFR. Granted, being IR makes long-range go/no-go planning easier, but the bottom line is that when you finally show up at the airport to fly, 90% of the time the weather is VFR or shortly will be for the entire route of your flight.

Case in point, this past weekend, I flew from Louisiana to Virginia on Friday, Virginia to Florida on Saturday, and Florida to Louisiana on Sunday. Although there were widespread IFR and marginal VFR conditions over those states and the states in between all three days, none of it impacted my ability to file and fly VFR because of the transient nature of IFR conditions when you’re dealing with multi-state travel. And, NO, I didn’t scud-run, nor did I illegally pop through an overcast at any point. I DID delay leaving Saturday morning by 45 minutes to let the fog burn off at my departure airport (I wouldn’t have flown out IFR either since the ceilings were below IFR minimums if I had to return to the field.)

So, the lack of resale value argument mentioned in this thread is valid, but the lack of utility argument simply does not compute.

That was a very tongue in cheek statement. I thought that was excellent. I see some of the same 182 and 172 Cessnas on ASO that were for sale when I was looking for an SR-20. The Cirrus brokers must be making enought money to buy an eclipse jet![:)]

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This is a flat-out stupidly untruthful statement.


Wanna fight?

Kidding, chill out, no need to throw antagonistic insults around.

Opinions are like a$$holes, everyone has one. My opinion is still that without IR, there is no GUARANTEED utility to an aircraft. Sure, there are times when you can fly around the country VFR and make it. However, if you are trying to plan a trip, make hotel reservations, take guests with you, make an event etc, you NEED an IR to guarantee (to whatever degree that an IR safely allows) making the trip as planned.

The fact that an IR makes you a safer, more capable pilot, effectively doubles your dual training, lowers your insurance premiums are also big reasons to obtain an IR. If one purchases an SRV, getting an IR is not an option (unless you plan on renting a different aircraft).

So that’s my opinion with my logic behind it.

Rick

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That was a very tongue in cheek statement. I thought that was excellent. I see some of the same 182 and 172 Cessnas on ASO that were for sale when I was looking for an SR-20. The Cirrus brokers must be making enought money to buy an eclipse jet!


Jim,

My bad! I guess I was reacting to the prevailing view that low-end Cirrus airplanes will have a tough time on the resale market. I know that to be backwards… brokers can’t get enough SR20s.

Sorry for taking you seriously! [;)]

  • Mike.

Though I generally agree with all the reasons for buying an IFR airplane, it depends a lot on the individual pilot. There are some hardcore, VFR only pilots, who like it that way and plan only to fly that way. Furthermore, it’s not so difficult and constraining as you might think…I have an IFR airplane, but spend most of my time in a Pitts…which I have flown many times from Washington DC to Florida, to New York, to Mississippi and Tennessee, and even from the factory in Afton Wyoming to the East Coast. That is with only a GPS, compass, radio and transponder …the plane has no gyro instruments or lights. So, if you are not concerned about highest possible re-sale, and are VFR only…why spend the oodles of bucks for equipment you don’t need?

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So, if you are not concerned about highest possible re-sale, and are VFR only…why spend the oodles of bucks for equipment you don’t need?


David,

Agree - and if the missions are in the desert southwest (as I suspect these are), where VMC conditions prevail 94% of the days, it applies even MORE! I never understood the idea of buying “for resale value” in the first place - it makes no sense to me at all. And the notion of a low-end airplane having limited resale potential is a falacy - used airplane sales figures bear that out.

  • Mike.

I am just starting to fly in the Cirrus aircraft. I love it, but are there any hints you might have in regard to sticking your landings on a more consistant basis?

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…but are there any hints you might have in regard to sticking your landings on a more consistant basis?


Sure.
Step one - join the member side
never mind
I thought you said crustacean terrorists!

Step two - search for “landing”

Step three - plan to spend a fair amount of time absorbing all the valuable information already posted there.

I don’t mean to be flippant. I have lots of good advice but it’s already been posted repeatedly.

If you find yourself near the N GA mountains I’m a CFI and would be happy to help out with some dual.

Good luck.

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Sure.

Step one - join the member side


Uh - Fast Eddie… Rick’s a member!

Rick,

Fast Eddie’s advice is good - and if you post there after you’ve searched, you’ll get LOTS of good suggestions, including (probably) a bunch from Fast (reader) Eddie, too! [;)]

  • Mike.

In reply to:


Uh - Fast Eddie… Rick’s a member!


[insert appropriate “d’oh” graphic here]

I assumed something from the placement of the post. You know what happens when you assume.

Except for #1, same advice applies.

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I assumed something from the placement of the post. You know what happens when you assume.
Except for #1, same advice applies.