SR 20 vs 22 decision/ placehholder

I am an sr20 placeholder with scheduled delivery June 2002. I missed the option for switching to the 22 when it was sent out, but am still considering it. I would appreciate hearing some discussion on the pros and cons. Money is an object with me since it will already be a stretcheven to get the SR20 after I sell my 1991 Tiger. However I do not want to be penny wise/pound foolish in terms of eventual resale value should the day come that i can no longer fly (not getting any younger).

I had planned to purchase the C package and get the leather and possibly the 3 blade prop. Some of this is standard in the 22 so as I see it the price jump would be around $63K

On the other hand, by the time my number is ready who knows what the standard configutations, useful loads etc will be.

What to do???

Larry

Jim Fallows, in an earlier post on this topic, got the decision point right. If you live in the west, go for the SR22. You’ll want the extra HP for summer days in the Rockies and Sierras.

I am an sr20 placeholder with scheduled delivery June 2002. I missed the option for switching to the 22 when it was sent out, but am still considering it. I would appreciate hearing some discussion on the pros and cons. Money is an object with me since it will already be a stretcheven to get the SR20 after I sell my 1991 Tiger. However I do not want to be penny wise/pound foolish in terms of eventual resale value should the day come that i can no longer fly (not getting any younger).

I had planned to purchase the C package and get the leather and possibly the 3 blade prop. Some of this is standard in the 22 so as I see it the price jump would be around $63K

On the other hand, by the time my number is ready who knows what the standard configutations, useful loads etc will be.

What to do???

Larry

I am an sr20 placeholder with scheduled delivery June 2002. I missed the option for switching to the 22 when it was sent out, but am still considering it. I would appreciate hearing some discussion on the pros and cons. Money is an object with me since it will already be a stretcheven to get the SR20 after I sell my 1991 Tiger. However I do not want to be penny wise/pound foolish in terms of eventual resale value should the day come that i can no longer fly (not getting any younger).

I had planned to purchase the C package and get the leather and possibly the 3 blade prop. Some of this is standard in the 22 so as I see it the price jump would be around $63K

On the other hand, by the time my number is ready who knows what the standard configutations, useful loads etc will be.

What to do???

Larry

Larry,

I too faced the same dilemma that you are currently facing,(money, me getting “longer-in-the tooth” + figuring this will be my only new airplane as an exclusive owner). At the time the upgrade offer originally came from Cirrus, I had not yet had my intro flight. Also at the time there was alot of talk on this site of the intended mission of the plane which is a very logical way of deciding which plane to get. Economics, useful load, hanger door width, are some of the considerations that have been discussed here. For me it was take-off run. Even though the turf strip at our fly-in community is in very good condition the takeoff run on the SR20 was long enough to make it just useable in all but perfect (i.e. dry conditions) if anywhere near gross wt. When the empty wt crept up it would mean that most takeoffs would be in the upper end of the current load range. The anticipated usefull load increase would not really do any good to shorten the takeoff roll.
A demo flight out of my home base confirmed my suspicions. I initially rationalized away my concerns about the high pucker factor on takeoffs but in the end I decided to listen to my belly. I have found in times past that you head can get you into trouble if you discount your belly (that gut feeling).

You can still upgrade at the same offered price you just have to get at the end of the line.

Another option is to deal on the open market but unless you can get a refund from Cirrus my guess is that as production increases and wait times lessen it will be harder to sell your SR20 position for enough over list to make up for the deal that Cirrus is offering to upgrade.

If you are willing to trade the “A” config. on the SR22 with its increase in performance for the “C” on the SR20 the price difference is a little closer (rationalizing again).

Which ever way, they are both outstanding airplanes and I for one fell blessed to be in a position to have to make such a decision between them.

Regards, M. Myers

I am an sr20 placeholder
What to do???

Larry

Larry, the real decision lies in three areas. 1) Mission; 2) $; and 3) Emotions.

The first is plain and simple, but only you can decide what you need. If the '20 fits you missions, why pay more for the '22? I switched due primarily payload issues. I have a family of 4 and need all the weight carrying ability and flexibility w/fuel that I can get. Lastly, i liked the climb performance. But those were my issues, If I honly flew w/two in the plane the '20 would have been great.

Money is an issue and EVERYTHING will be more expensive on the '22. It just depends if the added benefits from #1 above (and #3 below) are worth it to you.

Emotions are important. This is a big purchase and you should be very happy with it for years. It seems most people buy the 3 blade prop on the '20 because it looks better. It may be marginally quieter and smoother, but it doesn’t affect performance. There are very few ‘mission’ facotrs in favor of this decision and weight, balance and cost going against it. Almost always an emotional decision to buy. I would not get it because the 15 - 18 extra lbs, the CG issues and the cost of purchase and maintenance were not worth it for me.

Finally, a fourth item: will the SR22’s wingspan be a factor where you keep it?

Good luck with your decision.

Marty (SR22 # 20)

Jim Fallows, in an earlier post on this topic, got the decision point right. If you live in the west, go for the SR22. You’ll want the extra HP for summer days in the Rockies and Sierras.

Depends on your mission. Unless you plan on crossing the Rockies and the Sierras in their midsections, you probably don’t really need more than a 20. I’m moving up from a 20 to a 22 because the airport where I’m basing the aircraft (SAF) has a field elevation of over 6300 feet, and I want the extra climb performance.

It’s certainly nice to have all that extra power (and the wee bit of extra speed that comes with it) but if money is at least somewhat of an object, and you’re not making a habit of crossing high mountain ranges in the summer time, you should be quite happy with a 20. I doubt you’ll have any trouble reselling it either.