IFR-BOSTON AREA OWNERS

Hi I am position holder #0555, I like to know if anyone has flown the SR20 IFR.
I like to thank Bruce Gunter of CIRRUS for the demo flight but I like to meet with BOSTON AREA owners if anyone is willing please send me an E-mail.

Hi I am position holder #0555
Can you confirm that you are #555 - five hundred and fifty-five? That represents a large number of sales for Cirrus in the last month or so. The highest number I heard before this was 464.

Hi I am position holder #0555, I like to know if anyone has flown the SR20 IFR.
I like to thank Bruce Gunter of CIRRUS for the demo flight but I like to meet with BOSTON AREA owners if anyone is willing please send me an E-mail.

Demo flight, whats a demo flight?
Signed, Waiting On The West Coast For A Demo Ride

To get back to your original question: I have indeed flown the SR20 IFR, though it was only for the last hour or so of a 10-hour XC flight (the one I described in the magazine piece, El Monte -> Duluth).

We spent all of the first day VFR, winding up in Bryce Canyon in Utah. We started out the second day VFR, climbing (I think) to 17,500 – though it could have been 15,500 – to get over the Rockies in Colorado. For the record, we were using bottled oxygen, with the little nose tubes rather than masks. The large moving-map screen was useful even in this VFR portion, because it gave the elevations of the peaks ahead of us – we could tell that one off to the left was 1000 feet lower than the one dead ahead, and could angle there. The screen is NOT as elegant or contoured as a sectional VFR map, but showing the elevations of selected obstacles is a plus.

We landed in Scotts Bluff, Nebraska, for food and fuel, and somewhere over South Dakota the clouds we had been flying over rose up to meet and engulf us. For half of South Dakota, and much of the Minnesota part of the trip, we were in “actual” instrument conditions.

I was in the left seat for this second day of the flight, with Gary Black (chief of flight operations) in the right seat, and I found the SR20 a complete pleasure and breeze to fly IFR. I relied on the autopilot for heading hold during the IFR period, and hand-held the altitude. The only problem was when we started to pick up ice at, as I remember it, 9000 feet or so – then it was safe to descend, ultimately to 5000 feet, to get rid of the ice, which we did.

So my report is: the plane flew just great IFR. I am sure the few actual owners can give you more detailed accounts. Jim Fallows

As Cirrus sells more SR20s, the gap between “position #” and “contract #” widens.
For example, I have contract 513 (if I remember correctly . . . it might be 531 . . . I’m not in my office). But Tom Bergeron, the salesman out of Dallas, assured me when I wrote my check that I now own “position” 464.
It’s a bit confusing. Cirrus could do a better job of clarifying matters. But apparently the gap represents contract holders dropping out and forfeiting their position.
RK

Hi I am position holder #0555

Can you confirm that you are #555 - five hundred and fifty-five? That represents a large number of sales for Cirrus in the last month or so. The highest number I heard before this was 464.

Hi I am position holder #0555

Can you confirm that you are #555 - five hundred and fifty-five? That represents a large number of sales for Cirrus in the last month or so. The highest number I heard before this was 464.

YES I AM POSITION HOLDER #0555.WHAT I LIKE TO KNOW IF THERE IS HIGHER NUMBER THAN MINE OUT.

Hi I am position holder #0555

Can you confirm that you are #555 - five hundred and fifty-five? That represents a large number of sales for Cirrus in the last month or so. The highest number I heard before this was 464.

I am purchase agreement 476 as on November. I don’t know how that coorelates to position number - which I hope is less!

As Cirrus sells more SR20s, the gap between “position #” and “contract #” widens.

For example, I have contract 513 (if I remember correctly . . . it might be 531 . . . I’m not in my office). But Tom Bergeron, the salesman out of Dallas, assured me when I wrote my check that I now own “position” 464.

It’s a bit confusing. Cirrus could do a better job of clarifying matters. But apparently the gap represents contract holders dropping out and forfeiting their position.

RK

Hi I am position holder #0555

Can you confirm that you are #555 - five hundred and fifty-five? That represents a large number of sales for Cirrus in the last month or so. The highest number I heard before this was 464.

I read an article a few weeks ago that put the number near 490…don’t know currently…

As Cirrus sells more SR20s, the gap between “position #” and “contract #” widens.

For example, I have contract 513 (if I remember correctly . . . it might be 531 . . . I’m not in my office). But Tom Bergeron, the salesman out of Dallas, assured me when I wrote my check that I now own “position” 464.

It’s a bit confusing. Cirrus could do a better job of clarifying matters. But apparently the gap represents contract holders dropping out and forfeiting their position.

RK

Hi I am position holder #0555

Can you confirm that you are #555 - five hundred and fifty-five? That represents a large number of sales for Cirrus in the last month or so. The highest number I heard before this was 464.

I read an article a few weeks ago that put the number near 490…don’t know currently…

Last sentence says 487…as of jan.14

Tax Law Keeps Duluth, Minn.-Based Airplane Maker’s Customers at a Distance
Paul Adams

01/14/2000
KRTBN Knight-Ridder Tribune Business News: Duluth News-Tribune - Minnesota
Copyright © 2000 KRTBN Knight Ridder Tribune Business News; Source: World Reporter ™

If Cirrus Design had its way, customers would come to Duluth to pick up their new SR20 airplanes and spend a few days in town getting flight training while they’re at it.

But a quirk in Minnesota’s tax law has forced the company to deliver many of its planes in other states in order to avoid saddling their customers with what would amount to a double dose of sales tax.

Apparently, Minnesota lawmakers never anticipated the state would be home to a plane manufacturer. As a result, the state treats aircraft sales much the same way they do washing machines, said Bill King, vice president of the Duluth-based single-engine plane manufacturer. Sales tax is assessed at the point of delivery.

That means out-of-state customers could get hit with another sales tax bill when they return to their home state with the new airplane. On a roughly $200,000 airplane, the Minnesota sales tax exceeds $10,000.

“That’s a lot of money,” King said.

Cirrus is working with lawmakers to get the law changed. The legislation would direct the state Department of Revenue to treat airplanes much like automobiles.

Car buyers pay sales tax based on where they live. For example, if a Superior resident bought a car in Duluth, that person would pay Superior sales tax and vice versa. Many states already have similar laws on the books for airplanes as well.

In the meantime, Cirrus delivers planes in the customer’s home state or through a state that already treats airplanes like cars with respect to sales tax. One such state is North Dakota, where Cirrus has a manufacturing facility.

Changing the law would not result in reduced state tax collections, King said, since the state is already losing out on the sales tax unless the customer happens to live in Minnesota. The first customer SR20 was delivered to a Minnesota resident.

Cirrus Design continues to add staff at its Duluth facility, which is nearing 300 employees. The company has orders for 487 SR20s with a total sales value of more than $90 million.

This means Cirrus is selling SR20s at about 20+ a month.

Last sentence says 487…as of jan.14

Tax Law Keeps Duluth, Minn.-Based Airplane Maker’s Customers at a Distance
Paul Adams

01/14/2000
KRTBN Knight-Ridder Tribune Business News: Duluth News-Tribune - Minnesota
Copyright © 2000 KRTBN Knight Ridder Tribune Business News; Source: World Reporter ™

If Cirrus Design had its way, customers would come to Duluth to pick up their new SR20 airplanes and spend a few days in town getting flight training while they’re at it.

But a quirk in Minnesota’s tax law has forced the company to deliver many of its planes in other states in order to avoid saddling their customers with what would amount to a double dose of sales tax.

Apparently, Minnesota lawmakers never anticipated the state would be home to a plane manufacturer. As a result, the state treats aircraft sales much the same way they do washing machines, said Bill King, vice president of the Duluth-based single-engine plane manufacturer. Sales tax is assessed at the point of delivery.

That means out-of-state customers could get hit with another sales tax bill when they return to their home state with the new airplane. On a roughly $200,000 airplane, the Minnesota sales tax exceeds $10,000.

“That’s a lot of money,” King said.

Cirrus is working with lawmakers to get the law changed. The legislation would direct the state Department of Revenue to treat airplanes much like automobiles.

Car buyers pay sales tax based on where they live. For example, if a Superior resident bought a car in Duluth, that person would pay Superior sales tax and vice versa. Many states already have similar laws on the books for airplanes as well.

In the meantime, Cirrus delivers planes in the customer’s home state or through a state that already treats airplanes like cars with respect to sales tax. One such state is North Dakota, where Cirrus has a manufacturing facility.

Changing the law would not result in reduced state tax collections, King said, since the state is already losing out on the sales tax unless the customer happens to live in Minnesota. The first customer SR20 was delivered to a Minnesota resident.

Cirrus Design continues to add staff at its Duluth facility, which is nearing 300 employees. The company has orders for 487 SR20s with a total sales value of more than $90 million.

This means Cirrus is selling SR20s at about 20+ a month.

Actually, it looks better than that. The contract numbers (which appear to be higher than position numbers) have gone from 476 in November to 555 in January. Now it depends when in those months the sales were made, but that’s basically 79 sales in two months! That, I believe, is similar to the total number of orders that Lancair has for its Columbia 300 (i.e. < 100). Way to go, Cirrus!