Garmin GPSS

What is the experience with adding GPSS to the SR20?

Cost?

Time to install?

How did it perform? Better coupled aproaches?

I’d like to add it, but don’t want to be a pioneer.

Harrell

What is the experience with adding GPSS to the SR20?

Cost?

Time to install?

How did it perform? Better coupled aproaches?

I’d like to add it, but don’t want to be a pioneer.

Harrell,

Cost for me was about $1900, broken down into (roughly - I don’t have the invoice with me) $1k for the parts, $800 labor, and another $100 tax.

Time to install was about 2 days – took about 2 weeks for the parts to arrive from S-Tec, but only a couple days to install once it arrived. The installation was not difficult, according to the avionics tech who did it. There was a minor configuration problem when it was first installed, but that was solved quickly by changing a setting on the Garmin.

In any case, I don’t think you’re a pioneer – it seems to have been done successfully in a handful of planes so far.

How did it perform – on the 2 flights I took with GPSS, it worked great. Normally, the A/P (in NAV mode) would track pretty well but not exactly on course. With GPSS, the CDI needle is exactly centered and the little airplane on the Garmin is smack in the middle of the magenta line.

Also, it’s nice because when there are doglegs in the flight plan, the A/P will start turning right when the Garmin displays “turn to xxx”, and ends up rolling out right on course.

It was much better than just using NAV mode of the A/P.

Almost immediately after getting GPSS installed, I took the plane in for some squawks, and also get get the engine monitoring installed. That has turned out to be a rather lengthy process (unfortunately), and so I am still waiting to get the plane back. So I haven’t had any other chances to fly with GPSS or to shoot an approach with it.

Based on the limited enroute flying that I did, though, I would suspect it to perform very well on approach – on an ILS/LOC, I would expect better results from leaving the A/P coupled to the GPS, rather than coupling the A/P to the localizer. [Of course, one should always keep the CDI coupled to the localizer and not the GPS in order to be legal…]

So overall, 2 thumbs up!

Steve

What is the experience with adding GPSS to the SR20?

Cost?

Time to install?

How did it perform? Better coupled aproaches?

I’d like to add it, but don’t want to be a pioneer.

Harrell

I have installed the STEC GPSS in 6000C(#37) for a cost, installed, of $945. It works wonderfully. I can fly the new GPS approaches perfectly - controlling only the rate of descent.

Using this in the GPS mode it captures the flight plan from the 430 and flies flawlessly. It’s a must have. By the way, this SR20 is for sale because of the coming SR22.

What is the experience with adding GPSS to the SR20?

Cost?

Time to install?

How did it perform? Better coupled aproaches?

I’d like to add it, but don’t want to be a pioneer.

Harrell,

Cost for me was about $1900, broken down into (roughly - I don’t have the invoice with me) $1k for the parts, $800 labor, and another $100 tax.

Time to install was about 2 days – took about 2 weeks for the parts to arrive from S-Tec, but only a couple days to install once it arrived. The installation was not difficult, according to the avionics tech who did it. There was a minor configuration problem when it was first installed, but that was solved quickly by changing a setting on the Garmin.

In any case, I don’t think you’re a pioneer – it seems to have been done successfully in a handful of planes so far.

How did it perform – on the 2 flights I took with GPSS, it worked great. Normally, the A/P (in NAV mode) would track pretty well but not exactly on course. With GPSS, the CDI needle is exactly centered and the little airplane on the Garmin is smack in the middle of the magenta line.

Also, it’s nice because when there are doglegs in the flight plan, the A/P will start turning right when the Garmin displays “turn to xxx”, and ends up rolling out right on course.

It was much better than just using NAV mode of the A/P.

Almost immediately after getting GPSS installed, I took the plane in for some squawks, and also get get the engine monitoring installed. That has turned out to be a rather lengthy process (unfortunately), and so I am still waiting to get the plane back. So I haven’t had any other chances to fly with GPSS or to shoot an approach with it.

Based on the limited enroute flying that I did, though, I would suspect it to perform very well on approach – on an ILS/LOC, I would expect better results from leaving the A/P coupled to the GPS, rather than coupling the A/P to the localizer. [Of course, one should always keep the CDI coupled to the localizer and not the GPS in order to be legal…]

So overall, 2 thumbs up!

Steve

Additionally, if you use GPSS (“C” config) coupled with the nav mode, and the HSI should go out, you will still have autopilot function. In my opinion, this is a good reason to use this instead of the heading mode. On the GPSS on the 55x, and I expect on the 55+GPSS, the GPSS if activated works like a poor man’s (hah!) wing leveler - it either chases the magenta line on the flight plan, or if no plan is entered, it levels the wings.

Finally, I would think that on the “C” configuration, with two glideslopes, you could use Nav1 GPSS to couple to the autopilot, and Nav2 on the ILS, and be legal.

What is the experience with adding GPSS to the SR20?

Cost?

Time to install?

How did it perform? Better coupled aproaches?

I’d like to add it, but don’t want to be a pioneer.

Harrell,

Cost for me was about $1900, broken down into (roughly - I don’t have the invoice with me) $1k for the parts, $800 labor, and another $100 tax.

Time to install was about 2 days – took about 2 weeks for the parts to arrive from S-Tec, but only a couple days to install once it arrived. The installation was not difficult, according to the avionics tech who did it. There was a minor configuration problem when it was first installed, but that was solved quickly by changing a setting on the Garmin.

In any case, I don’t think you’re a pioneer – it seems to have been done successfully in a handful of planes so far.

How did it perform – on the 2 flights I took with GPSS, it worked great. Normally, the A/P (in NAV mode) would track pretty well but not exactly on course. With GPSS, the CDI needle is exactly centered and the little airplane on the Garmin is smack in the middle of the magenta line.

Also, it’s nice because when there are doglegs in the flight plan, the A/P will start turning right when the Garmin displays “turn to xxx”, and ends up rolling out right on course.

It was much better than just using NAV mode of the A/P.

Almost immediately after getting GPSS installed, I took the plane in for some squawks, and also get get the engine monitoring installed. That has turned out to be a rather lengthy process (unfortunately), and so I am still waiting to get the plane back. So I haven’t had any other chances to fly with GPSS or to shoot an approach with it.

Based on the limited enroute flying that I did, though, I would suspect it to perform very well on approach – on an ILS/LOC, I would expect better results from leaving the A/P coupled to the GPS, rather than coupling the A/P to the localizer. [Of course, one should always keep the CDI coupled to the localizer and not the GPS in order to be legal…]

So overall, 2 thumbs up!

Steve

Thanks very much for a complete answer.Its really helpful and I do plan to have this done soon.

I’m also just now ordering the Engineview. I will look for your report on that too when it done.

Thanks a lot.

Yes, this sounds like a must-have upgrade. When I pass through DLH in the summer I’ll get one installed then. Thanks for the report

What is the experience with adding GPSS to the SR20?

Cost?

Time to install?

How did it perform? Better coupled aproaches?

I’d like to add it, but don’t want to be a pioneer.

Harrell,

Cost for me was about $1900, broken down into (roughly - I don’t have the invoice with me) $1k for the parts, $800 labor, and another $100 tax.

Time to install was about 2 days – took about 2 weeks for the parts to arrive from S-Tec, but only a couple days to install once it arrived. The installation was not difficult, according to the avionics tech who did it. There was a minor configuration problem when it was first installed, but that was solved quickly by changing a setting on the Garmin.

In any case, I don’t think you’re a pioneer – it seems to have been done successfully in a handful of planes so far.

How did it perform – on the 2 flights I took with GPSS, it worked great. Normally, the A/P (in NAV mode) would track pretty well but not exactly on course. With GPSS, the CDI needle is exactly centered and the little airplane on the Garmin is smack in the middle of the magenta line.

Also, it’s nice because when there are doglegs in the flight plan, the A/P will start turning right when the Garmin displays “turn to xxx”, and ends up rolling out right on course.

It was much better than just using NAV mode of the A/P.

Almost immediately after getting GPSS installed, I took the plane in for some squawks, and also get get the engine monitoring installed. That has turned out to be a rather lengthy process (unfortunately), and so I am still waiting to get the plane back. So I haven’t had any other chances to fly with GPSS or to shoot an approach with it.

Based on the limited enroute flying that I did, though, I would suspect it to perform very well on approach – on an ILS/LOC, I would expect better results from leaving the A/P coupled to the GPS, rather than coupling the A/P to the localizer. [Of course, one should always keep the CDI coupled to the localizer and not the GPS in order to be legal…]

So overall, 2 thumbs up!

Steve

Additionally, if you use GPSS (“C” config) coupled with the nav mode, and the HSI should go out, you will still have autopilot function. In my opinion, this is a good reason to use this instead of the heading mode. On the GPSS on the 55x, and I expect on the 55+GPSS, the GPSS if activated works like a poor man’s (hah!) wing leveler - it either chases the magenta line on the flight plan, or if no plan is entered, it levels the wings.

Finally, I would think that on the “C” configuration, with two glideslopes, you could use Nav1 GPSS to couple to the autopilot, and Nav2 on the ILS, and be legal.

Here’s a question. If you are in GPSS, how do you easily navigate (detour) around buildups. Now I switch from NAV to HDG and turn the bug(after OK from controllers of course). This way I do not turn anything really off.

So how would that be done with GPSS?

Harrell

Here’s a question. If you are in GPSS, how do you easily navigate (detour) around buildups. Now I switch from NAV to HDG and turn the bug(after OK from controllers of course). This way I do not turn anything really off.

So how would that be done with GPSS?

Harrell

Same way, turn it off, then intercept your course later (or go direct to the next waypoint.)

GPSS pretty much works like NAV mode with an invisible hand cranking the course needle around when you reach waypoints.

What is the experience with adding GPSS to the SR20?

Cost?

Time to install?

How did it perform? Better coupled aproaches?

I’d like to add it, but don’t want to be a pioneer.

Harrell

I have installed the STEC GPSS in 6000C(#37) for a cost, installed, of $945. It works wonderfully. I can fly the new GPS approaches perfectly - controlling only the rate of descent.

Using this in the GPS mode it captures the flight plan from the 430 and flies flawlessly. It’s a must have. By the way, this SR20 is for sale because of the coming SR22.

When you write " for a cost, installed, of 945". , do you mean the labor was 945.00? And where did you have it done?

Thanks

Harrell