Cirrus Diesel

From “tomorrow”'s http://www.avweb.comAvWeb news:

Cirrus Announces Turbo-Diesel Powered Design

Thursday, at the AERO exhibition in Friedrichshafen, Germany, Cirrus Design Corp. and SMA, manufacturer of the SR-305 turbo-diesel engine, announced plans to develop a new diesel-powered aircraft, currently known as the SR21tdi. SMA, based near Paris, France, develops diesel engines for the aerospace industry. Detailed specifications about the aircraft/powerplant combination will not be available for a few months, but the new aircraft will be a derivative of the popular SR22 and should keep pace with a standard Cirrus SR22. Like the SR22, Cirrus says you can expect their new aircraft to see 170 knots at 12,000 feet, but burn less fuel (Jet-A, at that) and be available exclusively for Cirrus’ European customers. Ouch! “Along with the, unfortunately somewhat protracted discussions with JAA and other authorities, this is one more step towards satisfying customer needs in Europe and elsewhere,” said Cirrus President Alan Klapmeier. Position reservations are already being taken for the new aircraft, with first deliveries expected to reach customers in 2002. Cirrus is already an arguably revolutionary entrant into the certified production aircraft market and largely responsible for bringing ballistic parachute recovery systems to general aviation in the form of their Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS). So far, they’ve delivered more than 150 brand-new, certified, CAPS-equipped, composite four-seaters and the current order list puts at least 650 more in line behind them.

Great news! Thanks to Steve Lin for posting this. I imagine the phones will be ringing in Duluth on Monday with the question “When will the SR21tdi be available in the US?” The most recent news I’ve been able to find about the certification progress of the http://www.smaengines.com/SMA SR 305 is this March 5, 2001 item from AOPA Online. If anyone has anything newer, let’s hear it!
Cheers,
Roger #266

Company wins certification for diesel engine

Mar. 5 — A French company has received European certification for its aircraft four-cylinder four-stroke turbo diesel engine. SMA, Societe de Motorisation Aeronautiques, created four years ago for the development and sales of a range of piston aircraft engines operating on kerosene (Jet A), received the certification under the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) on January 19. The company completed the test phase of the 230-horsepower SMA Morane Renault MR 200 version in December. It will be the first engine in the series to be marketed commercially this year in Europe. Certification in the U.S. is expected to follow soon.

From this website more detailshttp://www.general-enterprises.com/Cirrus European representative General Enterprises news:

Cirrus Announces Turbo-Diesel Powered Design SR21tdi

Maybe I can STC my SR20 (A) in the future ?

:wink: Jaap SR20 683

“On April 20th, 2001 SMA obtained European Certification for the SR305 engine. The JAA Type Certificate #23 issued by the DGAC, is valid in the 33 countries. The US certification process has already commenced.”

This is from SMA’s press release dated April 26, 2001

Also of interest might be that Maule Air Inc. ordered the first engines to equip the M-7 with them. Plus there have been two STC programs launched: for Cessna 182 and TB20GT.

Regards,

Wilfried

“On April 20th, 2001 SMA obtained European Certification for the SR305 engine. The JAA Type Certificate #23 issued by the DGAC, is valid in the 33 countries. The US certification process has already commenced.”

This is from SMA’s press release dated April 26, 2001

Also of interest might be that Maule Air Inc. ordered the first engines to equip the M-7 with them. Plus there have been two STC programs launched: for Cessna 182 and TB20GT.

Regards,

Wilfried

Does anyone have any info on pricing for the Diesel as compaired to the Contientals MIKE#396

FWIW - I think any fears over CD’s long term viability would disappear if they were able to get the diesel versions of the SR series to market if the USA ahead of say new Cessna’s…etc.

Can you imagine all the advantages of a SRXX PLUS a 3000 TBO and cheaper gas!

I for one, would switch my 22 to a diesel today and if I had to wait another year… fine. Sign me up. Send me the papers.

Because for about the same $$ you are in turbocharged airplane with 2x the TBO. You are filing / flying more direct IFR’s in that mid 10’s alt. range where you can actually get those clearences. AND Jet is cheaper than 100LL by a nice margin.

Hurry up FAA!

According to the article at http://www.airventure.org/2000/day6/turbo_diesel.html the SR305 would cost around $70,000.00. ouch!

“On April 20th, 2001 SMA obtained European Certification for the SR305 engine. The JAA Type Certificate #23 issued by the DGAC, is valid in the 33 countries. The US certification process has already commenced.”

This is from SMA’s press release dated April 26, 2001

Also of interest might be that Maule Air Inc. ordered the first engines to equip the M-7 with them. Plus there have been two STC programs launched: for Cessna 182 and TB20GT.

Regards,

Wilfried

Does anyone have any info on pricing for the Diesel as compaired to the Contientals MIKE#396

According to the article at http://www.airventure.org/2000/day6/turbo_diesel.html the SR305 would cost around $70,000.00. ouch!

Altough JetA sounds very good, this might make the SR-TDI to expensive fot lots of people.

If it costs about the same as a SR22, how much hours of fuel can I burn in a SR20A before I reach an break even point, even with 3000 TBO (or TBR, time between replacement) at 6,70 a gallon for Avgas (or maybe MoGas, there is much talk about using it in Europe) and 2,0 for JetA, besides insurence other costs ?

Jaap SR20 #683

According to the article at http://www.airventure.org/2000/day6/turbo_diesel.html the SR305 would cost around $70,000.00. ouch!

Altough JetA sounds very good, this might make the SR-TDI to expensive fot lots of people.

If it costs about the same as a SR22, how much hours of fuel can I burn in a SR20A before I reach an break even point, even with 3000 TBO (or TBR, time between replacement) at 6,70 a gallon for Avgas (or maybe MoGas, there is much talk about using it in Europe) and 2,0 for JetA, besides insurence other costs ?

Jaap SR20 #683

I would expect the diesel to be cheaper than a 550 as a production engine (less moving parts, less maintainance, etc.).

Second, you can’t really compare it to SR20, since performance is expected to be more like SR22, though there are no specs available now.

You get more miles for your bucks at a higher level of flight and performance.

Again this is only MY opinion.

Regards, Wilfried

Outside of the US where GA is not as well supported, AvGas availability vs jet A availability is likely to favour the SR21td big time.

Because for about the same $$ you are in turbocharged airplane with 2x the TBO. You are filing / flying more direct IFR’s in that mid 10’s alt. range where you can actually get those clearences.

… rumors say ceiling will be around 25K feet …