Advice

Hi all, new to the forum. I have a turbo lance loaded with extras and over $ 220,000.00 into it. Considering selling it for a SR20/22. I test flew the SR20( no SR22 at the time ). Didn’t want to learn any controls due to check out requirements, just wanted to see what it felt like and what it took to get used to the joy stick. Any way the SR20 felt very light in comparison to my larger plane but I found it almost flew as fast on 1/2 the gas, which I liked. I landed the plane with absolutely no problems at all, which I was glad about. My real question is this, how comfortable is everyone with the endurance of the composite specifically longevity. I know my metal will last and just need to be reassured with your research

Thanks for all future replies and my possible admission the the Club

Metal rusts and oxidizes. Composit will last indfinitely if it isnotexposed to high heat or UV light. That will only happen if you do not keep the plane painted.
Look at all the boats and gliders out there that have flying and sailing forevermade from these materials. Moreover, the composite is stronger sois less likely to be damaged at all. Look at the Cirrus record of bird strikes if you have any question about that.

In reply to:


My real question is this, how comfortable is everyone with the endurance of the composite specifically longevity. I know my metal will last and just need to be reassured with your research


Tvespa,
Follow this link. The Boeing 7E7 will reportedly be 50% composite. This is the future (at least until someone invents the next best thing), and, as Brian and David point out, composites have been compiling quite a good past as well.

DonÂ’t let the composite issue worry you one bit. I have been researching the possibility of getting, among other things, a 414 or 421. Right now there is a huge cloud hanging over the Twin-Cessna community because of a proposed AD requiring a $70,000+ spar strap to help protect the aircraft from potential wear and corrosion induced wing-spar failure leading to in-flight wing separation. I can only wish that advanced composite technology had been around when these aircraft were designed and constructed, because this issue wouldnÂ’t even be on the table.

You can trust composites, you can trust Cirrus, and you can trust us. [:)] A decision for an SR20 or SR22 will be a decision to plaster a smile on your face for a long time, the likes of which will have not been seen since that glorious first-solo (after getting back on the ground in one piece, of course [;)])

As you get closer to making a decision, I would recommend spending the miniscule $50.00 for a year-long membership because there is a wealth of information about the aircraft on the member’s side. Many guys have saved literally thousands of dollars because of what is posted there. My “Blue State” city-folk friends tell me that fifty-bucks will only buy a fraction of a nice dinner, although it will often get you the whole thing here in Madison. [;)]

Also, test drive a Â’22 if you get a chance. It will knock your socks off!!!

I look forward to hearing what you decide. [:)]

Diamond Aircraft has been building certified composite planes for 10 years+ and homebuilders for over 20 years. Airbus uses composite tail feathers. Except for the Airbus that broke the rudder over New York in 2001, I’ve yet to hear of a composite breaking any part in-flight…can’t say the same for metal. (Besides…it wasn’t the composite that was the problem on the Airbus, but training and poor rudder control design).

And it was not the composite that broke on the Airbus It was the bracket connection of the rudder to the main body of the plane that failed.