About America:

I was born and raised in Hungary, and was 21 years old when I planned an escape from a then communist country. Without passport went to Yugoslavia, then escaped to Italy. Spent 6 months in refugee camps to wait for a trip to my Land of Dreams: America. Before landing in JFK, our plane was in a holding pattern and circled the Statue of Liberty numerous times. It was a dream for me …

…and now with a tear in my eyes, and a terrible pain in my heart and soul, I have seen here at HOME, what I have seen so many times in Israel, in Hungary and in Russia: the terrorist bombs, the car bombs, the mutilated bodies, and parts laying around. But I know, that even though this shock will never disappear, it will subside with our resolve, that this WAS IT! It will never happen again, because like so many times before, the US has helped all those in need, we will lead the free world to a United Response against humanity’s greatest threat: terrorism. A friend of my e-mailed this Canadian clip from a news paper: it’s worth to read! And although I still have an accent when I speak, I am proud to say together with every one of you and all the millions, that I am one happy person to be able to say it:

We the People…

A TRIBUTE TO THE UNITED STATES

This, from a Canadian newspaper, is worth sharing.

America: The Good Neighbor.

Widespread but only partial news coverage was given recently to a remarkable editorial broadcast from Toronto by Gordon Sinclair, a Canadian television commentator. What follows is the full text of his trenchant remarks as printed in the Congressional Record:

"This Canadian thinks it is time to speak up for the Americans as the most generous and possibly the least appreciated people on all the earth.

Germany, Japan and, to a lesser extent, Britain and Italy were lifted out of the debris of war by the Americans who poured in billions of dollars and forgave other billions in debts. None of these countries is today paying even the interest on its remaining debts to the United States.

When France was in danger of collapsing in 1956,
it was the Americans who propped it up, and their
reward was to be insulted and swindled on the streets of Paris. I was there. I saw it.

When earthquakes hit distant cities, it is the
United States that hurries in to help. This spring, 59 American communities were flattened by tornadoes. Nobody helped.

The Marshall Plan and the Truman Policy pumped
billions of dollars! into discouraged countries. Now newspapers in those countries are writing about the decadent, warmongering Americans.

I’d like to see just one of those countries that
is gloating over the erosion of the United States
dollar build its own airplane. Does any other country in the world have a plane to equal the Boeing Jumbo Jet, the Lockheed Tri-Star, or the Douglas DC10? If so, why don’t they fly them? Why do all the International lines except Russia fly American Planes?

Why does no other land on earth even consider putting a man or woman on the moon? You talk about Japanese technocracy, and you get radios. You talk about German technocracy, and you get automobiles.

You talk about American technocracy, and you find
men on the moon -! not once, but several times -
and safely home again.

You talk about scandals, and the Americans put theirs right in the store window for everybody to look at. Even their draft-dodgers are not pursued and hounded. They are here on our streets, and most of them, unless they are breaking Canadian laws, are getting American dollars from ma and pa at home to spend here.

When the railways of France, Germany and India
were breaking down through age, it was the Americans who rebuilt them. When the Pennsylvania Railroad and the New York Central went broke, nobody loaned them an old caboose. Both are still broke.

I can name you 5000 times when the Americans raced to the help of other people in trouble. Can you name me even one time when someone else raced to the Americans in trouble? I don’t think there was outside help even during the San Francisco earthquake.

Our neighbors have faced it alone, and I’m one
Canadian who is damned tired of hearing them get
kicked around. They will come out of this thing with their flag high. And when they do, they are entitled to thumb their nose at the lands that are gloating over their present troubles. I hope Canada is not one of those."

Stand proud, America!

This is one of the best editorials that I have ever read regarding the United States. It is nice that one man realizes it. I only wish that the rest of the world would realize it. We are always blamed for everything and never even get a thank you for the things we do.

I would hope that each of you would send this to
as many people as you can and emphasize that they
should send it to as many of their friends until this letter is sent to every person on the web. I am just an American that has read this.

I was born and raised in Hungary, and was 21 years old when I planned an escape from a then communist country. Without passport went to Yugoslavia, then escaped to Italy. Spent 6 months in refugee camps to wait for a trip to my Land of Dreams: America. Before landing in JFK, our plane was in a holding pattern and circled the Statue of Liberty numerous times. It was a dream for me …

…and now with a tear in my eyes, and a terrible pain in my heart and soul, I have seen here at HOME, what I have seen so many times in Israel, in Hungary and in Russia: the terrorist bombs, the car bombs, the mutilated bodies, and parts laying around. But I know, that even though this shock will never disappear, it will subside with our resolve, that this WAS IT! It will never happen again, because like so many times before, the US has helped all those in need, we will lead the free world to a United Response against humanity’s greatest threat: terrorism. A friend of my e-mailed this Canadian clip from a news paper: it’s worth to read! And although I still have an accent when I speak, I am proud to say together with every one of you and all the millions, that I am one happy person to be able to say it:

We the People…

A TRIBUTE TO THE UNITED STATES

This, from a Canadian newspaper, is worth sharing.

America: The Good Neighbor.

Michael, thanks for your eloquence.

Please see http://www.phillytalkradioonline.com/comment/usa.html
for background information on the tribute you quoted (actually written in 1973).

Phil

I was born and raised in Hungary, and was 21 years old when I planned an escape from a then communist country. Without passport went to Yugoslavia, then escaped to Italy. Spent 6 months in refugee camps to wait for a trip to my Land of Dreams: America. Before landing in JFK, our plane was in a holding pattern and circled the Statue of Liberty numerous times. It was a dream for me …

…and now with a tear in my eyes, and a terrible pain in my heart and soul, I have seen here at HOME, what I have seen so many times in Israel, in Hungary and in Russia: the terrorist bombs, the car bombs, the mutilated bodies, and parts laying around. But I know, that even though this shock will never disappear, it will subside with our resolve, that this WAS IT! It will never happen again, because like so many times before, the US has helped all those in need, we will lead the free world to a United Response against humanity’s greatest threat: terrorism. A friend of my e-mailed this Canadian clip from a news paper: it’s worth to read! And although I still have an accent when I speak, I am proud to say together with every one of you and all the millions, that I am one happy person to be able to say it:

We the People…

A TRIBUTE TO THE UNITED STATES

This, from a Canadian newspaper, is worth sharing.

America: The Good Neighbor.

Michael, thanks for your eloquence.

Please see http://www.phillytalkradioonline.com/comment/usa.html
for background information on the tribute you quoted (actually written in 1973).

Phil

Dear Phil,

I had no idea about him. I didn’t even knew when he wrote this. But every word he wrote 28 years ago, is still true today. It’s true there is Airbus, but look at the number of countries it takes to build it. He must have been a special person. I’ll ceartainly look up his other stories. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

I was born and raised in Hungary, and was 21 years old when I planned an escape from a then communist country. Without passport went to Yugoslavia, then escaped to Italy. Spent 6 months in refugee camps to wait for a trip to my Land of Dreams: America. Before landing in JFK, our plane was in a holding pattern and circled the Statue of Liberty numerous times. It was a dream for me …

…and now with a tear in my eyes, and a terrible pain in my heart and soul, I have seen here at HOME, what I have seen so many times in Israel, in Hungary and in Russia: the terrorist bombs, the car bombs, the mutilated bodies, and parts laying around. But I know, that even though this shock will never disappear, it will subside with our resolve, that this WAS IT! It will never happen again, because like so many times before, the US has helped all those in need, we will lead the free world to a United Response against humanity’s greatest threat: terrorism. A friend of my e-mailed this Canadian clip from a news paper: it’s worth to read! And although I still have an accent when I speak, I am proud to say together with every one of you and all the millions, that I am one happy person to be able to say it:

We the People…

A TRIBUTE TO THE UNITED STATES

This, from a Canadian newspaper, is worth sharing.

America: The Good Neighbor.

Michael, thanks for your eloquence.

Please see http://www.phillytalkradioonline.com/comment/usa.html
for background information on the tribute you quoted (actually written in 1973).

Phil

Dear Phil,

I had no idea about him. I didn’t even knew when he wrote this. But every word he wrote 28 years ago, is still true today. It’s true there is Airbus, but look at the number of countries it takes to build it. He must have been a special person. I’ll ceartainly look up his other stories. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

It’s great to celebrate America. Perhaps we don’t get enough recognition. However, quoting something this old can be misleading. Moreover,outdated avaiation facts aside, there’s still very little trueth in all of this chest pounding:

The British and French make lots of airplanes, and lots of American airlines fly them (Airbus Industries).

Foreign help to the tune of tens of millions of dollars poured into San Francisco after the earthquake.

Most WWII debts were, in fact, “forgiven” by America–why, then, would we expect anyone to be, “paying even the interest?” I do not know of any remaining, recognized debt from WWII.

Being swindled on the streets of Paris is an insult to the vast majority of French people. Hundreds of thousands of Americans make Paris the

centerpiece of their vacations every year–and not because we are being collectively, “swindled on the streets” there.

If the writer knew the first thing about the Marshall Plan, he wouldn’t even start talking about financial return. He would want to close the door on the discussion before being inundated with the usury, graft and economic exploitation of this dictator-centric policy. As an American, I am not proud of the Marshall Plan. For a more reasoned counterpoint, read Graham Greene’s, “The Ugly American.” My point is not to make you (or any other American) feel bad, but to get some perspective … some balance regarding what Marshall & company did in Central America.

The French and Germans rebuilt their own railways–using their own technology that is being studied in this country. (I have no idea who

rebuilt the Indian railways.)

Bottom line: This kind of poppycock can get people fired up in the wrong way, in my opinion. False pride is the very worst kind of pride.

I think that, overall, America is a fine global citizen, and has often been a good neighbor. I also believe that we have much to be proud of–not much of which is really listed in this speech.

I was born and raised in Hungary, and was 21 years old when I planned an escape from a then communist country. Without passport went to Yugoslavia, then escaped to Italy. Spent 6 months in refugee camps to wait for a trip to my Land of Dreams: America. Before landing in JFK, our plane was in a holding pattern and circled the Statue of Liberty numerous times. It was a dream for me …

…and now with a tear in my eyes, and a terrible pain in my heart and soul, I have seen here at HOME, what I have seen so many times in Israel, in Hungary and in Russia: the terrorist bombs, the car bombs, the mutilated bodies, and parts laying around. But I know, that even though this shock will never disappear, it will subside with our resolve, that this WAS IT! It will never happen again, because like so many times before, the US has helped all those in need, we will lead the free world to a United Response against humanity’s greatest threat: terrorism. A friend of my e-mailed this Canadian clip from a news paper: it’s worth to read! And although I still have an accent when I speak, I am proud to say together with every one of you and all the millions, that I am one happy person to be able to say it:

We the People…

A TRIBUTE TO THE UNITED STATES

This, from a Canadian newspaper, is worth sharing.

America: The Good Neighbor.

Michael, thanks for your eloquence.

Please see http://www.phillytalkradioonline.com/comment/usa.html
for background information on the tribute you quoted (actually written in 1973).

Phil

Dear Phil,

I had no idea about him. I didn’t even knew when he wrote this. But every word he wrote 28 years ago, is still true today. It’s true there is Airbus, but look at the number of countries it takes to build it. He must have been a special person. I’ll ceartainly look up his other stories. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

It’s great to celebrate America. Perhaps we don’t get enough recognition. However, quoting something this old can be misleading. Moreover,outdated avaiation facts aside, there’s still very little trueth in all of this chest pounding:

The British and French make lots of airplanes, and lots of American airlines fly them (Airbus Industries).

Foreign help to the tune of tens of millions of dollars poured into San Francisco after the earthquake.

Most WWII debts were, in fact, “forgiven” by America–why, then, would we expect anyone to be, “paying even the interest?” I do not know of any remaining, recognized debt from WWII.

Being swindled on the streets of Paris is an insult to the vast majority of French people. Hundreds of thousands of Americans make Paris the

centerpiece of their vacations every year–and not because we are being collectively, “swindled on the streets” there.

If the writer knew the first thing about the Marshall Plan, he wouldn’t even start talking about financial return. He would want to close the door on the discussion before being inundated with the usury, graft and economic exploitation of this dictator-centric policy. As an American, I am not proud of the Marshall Plan. For a more reasoned counterpoint, read Graham Greene’s, “The Ugly American.” My point is not to make you (or any other American) feel bad, but to get some perspective … some balance regarding what Marshall & company did in Central America.

The French and Germans rebuilt their own railways–using their own technology that is being studied in this country. (I have no idea who

rebuilt the Indian railways.)

Bottom line: This kind of poppycock can get people fired up in the wrong way, in my opinion. False pride is the very worst kind of pride.

I think that, overall, America is a fine global citizen, and has often been a good neighbor. I also believe that we have much to be proud of–not much of which is really listed in this speech.

Hi,

Honestly I don’t want to get into an argument about this. When I received this editorial this morning, I had no idea, that this was written 28 years ago. Whatever he wrote, he believed it was all true.

Only four things I would like to add to this:

1.)I have traveled in over 100 countries. I was only three times robbed: once in Cuzco in Peru, and twice by pickpocets in Paris. None of the three was successful, my walet was attached to a chain and I discovered all three.

2.)In Switzerland I landed once in Zurich in 1975 and was visiting a friend next to the airport. My wife forgot her purse on the pushcart with all of our passports, airline tickets and over $5,000 in cash. Someone found it and took it to the airport’s Lost & Found. There they opened it and sent a telegram to my home, that they have everything. The same evening we returned, past 10 at night, someone came to the airport from his home and opened the doors to the Lost & Found, and gave us back everything. Two weeks later, when we got home, the telegram was waiting for us, which they sent before we picked up her purse.

3.) Airbus is not one country’s production, but several, as I am sure you know as well. There is still no country on Earth that can match the 747 AND made by one country, as he wrote. Don’t even think of the great Russian behemot, which can’t take off with a full load of passengers. I know, I flew it many times. All we ever had tickets on it was in the middle, because of CG concerns.

4.) I was born and grew up in Hungary. Having a unique point of view, growing up there, then coming to the US, I am positive, that most of the citizens of the countries behind the iron curtain would have loved to be inundated with the usury, graft and economic exploitation of this dictator-centric policy of the Marshall plan, and would have loved the help of the US and NATO, rather than live 45 years under the protective wings and dictator-centric policy of the Soviet Union. If I would have had a choice!!!..

But, it’s in the past, and as Woor so aptly closes ALL his letters: Have a Great Cirrus Day!

Michael

I was born and raised in Hungary, and was 21 years old when I planned an escape from a then communist country. Without passport went to Yugoslavia, then escaped to Italy. Spent 6 months in refugee camps to wait for a trip to my Land of Dreams: America. Before landing in JFK, our plane was in a holding pattern and circled the Statue of Liberty numerous times. It was a dream for me …

…and now with a tear in my eyes, and a terrible pain in my heart and soul, I have seen here at HOME, what I have seen so many times in Israel, in Hungary and in Russia: the terrorist bombs, the car bombs, the mutilated bodies, and parts laying around. But I know, that even though this shock will never disappear, it will subside with our resolve, that this WAS IT! It will never happen again, because like so many times before, the US has helped all those in need, we will lead the free world to a United Response against humanity’s greatest threat: terrorism. A friend of my e-mailed this Canadian clip from a news paper: it’s worth to read! And although I still have an accent when I speak, I am proud to say together with every one of you and all the millions, that I am one happy person to be able to say it:

We the People…

A TRIBUTE TO THE UNITED STATES

This, from a Canadian newspaper, is worth sharing.

America: The Good Neighbor.

Michael, thanks for your eloquence.

Please see http://www.phillytalkradioonline.com/comment/usa.html
for background information on the tribute you quoted (actually written in 1973).

Phil

Dear Phil,

I had no idea about him. I didn’t even knew when he wrote this. But every word he wrote 28 years ago, is still true today. It’s true there is Airbus, but look at the number of countries it takes to build it. He must have been a special person. I’ll ceartainly look up his other stories. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

It’s great to celebrate America. Perhaps we don’t get enough recognition. However, quoting something this old can be misleading. Moreover,outdated avaiation facts aside, there’s still very little trueth in all of this chest pounding:

The British and French make lots of airplanes, and lots of American airlines fly them (Airbus Industries).

Foreign help to the tune of tens of millions of dollars poured into San Francisco after the earthquake.

Most WWII debts were, in fact, “forgiven” by America–why, then, would we expect anyone to be, “paying even the interest?” I do not know of any remaining, recognized debt from WWII.

Being swindled on the streets of Paris is an insult to the vast majority of French people. Hundreds of thousands of Americans make Paris the

centerpiece of their vacations every year–and not because we are being collectively, “swindled on the streets” there.

If the writer knew the first thing about the Marshall Plan, he wouldn’t even start talking about financial return. He would want to close the door on the discussion before being inundated with the usury, graft and economic exploitation of this dictator-centric policy. As an American, I am not proud of the Marshall Plan. For a more reasoned counterpoint, read Graham Greene’s, “The Ugly American.” My point is not to make you (or any other American) feel bad, but to get some perspective … some balance regarding what Marshall & company did in Central America.

The French and Germans rebuilt their own railways–using their own technology that is being studied in this country. (I have no idea who

rebuilt the Indian railways.)

Bottom line: This kind of poppycock can get people fired up in the wrong way, in my opinion. False pride is the very worst kind of pride.

I think that, overall, America is a fine global citizen, and has often been a good neighbor. I also believe that we have much to be proud of–not much of which is really listed in this speech.

Hello again,

I would really like to read Graham Greene’s, “The Ugly American.”, you mentioned in your letter, but I could not find it anywhere. Perhaps you could point me in the right direction. I would love to read it!

Thanks a lot

Michael

I would really like to read Graham Greene’s, “The Ugly American.”, you mentioned in your letter, but I could not find it anywhere. Perhaps you could point me in the right direction. I would love to read it!

Thanks a lot

Michael

Two books conflated as one here:

“The Ugly American,” by Eugene Burdick and William Lederer (Burdick was also co-author of Fail Safe);

“The Quiet American,” by Graham Greene.

They’re similar, in that they’re both about some of the naive, blundering aspects of 1960s-era U.S. Cold War policy, especially as it played out in Asia. (Greene’s was set in Vietnam and was seen during the Vietnam era as an explicit cautionary tale about the U.S. getting involved there.) The Burdick-Lederer, as I remember it, was in some fictionalized SE Asian country, hybrid of Philippines and Vietnam. Greene’s is seen as Real Literature, the other as a thriller. Both worth reading. I’m sure both would be on Amazon.