Supporting the habit?

Folks,

One of the things we did on the American Bonanza Society email list was share our method of supporting the nasty (and expensive) habit of owning and flying airplanes.

As a newly graduated mechanical engineer (although in my mid 30s, having served as a Navy Submarine enlisted man before heading to college), this was a very enlightening and uplifting discussion. Based on reading what other folks had done to acheive the relatively high level of income required to fly expensive airplanes, I started several businesses on the side and am finally on my way to being able to afford something like a Cirrus.

So, to start us off, here is what I do for a living:

  1. Engineering Program Manager for the Advanced Technology Institute (my day job). Basically we form teams from many large companies and organizations (Raytheon, Ford, NASA,…), write and win proposals for Government or Industry contracts, and manage them. After gaining confidence from reading about how others were making a living, I quit this job in March. But they gave me a raise and allowed me to work on my other businesses in exchange for me staying with them. I was VERY pleased and have a renewed feeling of freedom and autonomy.

  2. President and Janitor of “Office Calls”, a business in which I fix computer problems in small business offices after working hours. This is a wonderfully fulfilling job, due to the immediate gratification I receive from people in need.

  3. Owner of CharlestonArea.com and SantaFeLiving.com. Mostly I use these web sites to attract customers to my website design and hosting business, VeraNova.

Although I work about 80 hours/week at present, I am pleased to report that my wife and I can now actually scrape by on my salary from #1, above, and we are well on our way to becoming airplane owners due to income from #s 2 and 3.

I hope you contribute to this thread and find it as interesting and uplifting as we all did on the ABS.

Sincerely,

Mike Stiteler

Charleston, South Carolina

I am an investor and index options trader. I started by selling everything that I owned including my C310 to raise capital. I moved into the cheapest housing that I could find to reduce my outgo to an absolute minimum. Over the last couple of years I have been able to harvest some of my profits. I’ve recently realized my dream of living in Sisters, Oregon. A friend and I are currently shopping for a C182. I plan on placing an order for a new Cirrus as soon as they announce a turbocharged version (hopefully a desiel). I make most of my money through option trading out of my office at home. I work 3 weeks a year and take summers off :slight_smile: M>

Folks,

One of the things we did on the American Bonanza Society email list was share our method of supporting the nasty (and expensive) habit of owning and flying airplanes.

As a newly graduated mechanical engineer (although in my mid 30s, having served as a Navy Submarine enlisted man before heading to college), this was a very enlightening and uplifting discussion. Based on reading what other folks had done to acheive the relatively high level of income required to fly expensive airplanes, I started several businesses on the side and am finally on my way to being able to afford something like a Cirrus.

So, to start us off, here is what I do for a living:

  1. Engineering Program Manager for the Advanced Technology Institute (my day job). Basically we form teams from many large companies and organizations (Raytheon, Ford, NASA,…), write and win proposals for Government or Industry contracts, and manage them. After gaining confidence from reading about how others were making a living, I quit this job in March. But they gave me a raise and allowed me to work on my other businesses in exchange for me staying with them. I was VERY pleased and have a renewed feeling of freedom and autonomy.
  1. President and Janitor of “Office Calls”, a business in which I fix computer problems in small business offices after working hours. This is a wonderfully fulfilling job, due to the immediate gratification I receive from people in need.
  1. Owner of CharlestonArea.com and SantaFeLiving.com. Mostly I use these web sites to attract customers to my website design and hosting business, VeraNova.

Although I work about 80 hours/week at present, I am pleased to report that my wife and I can now actually scrape by on my salary from #1, above, and we are well on our way to becoming airplane owners due to income from #s 2 and 3.

I hope you contribute to this thread and find it as interesting and uplifting as we all did on the ABS.

Sincerely,

Mike Stiteler

Charleston, South Carolina

Folks,

One of the things we did on the American Bonanza Society email list was share our method of supporting the nasty (and expensive) habit of owning and flying airplanes.

As a newly graduated mechanical engineer (although in my mid 30s, having served as a Navy Submarine enlisted man before heading to college), this was a very enlightening and uplifting discussion. Based on reading what other folks had done to acheive the relatively high level of income required to fly expensive airplanes, I started several businesses on the side and am finally on my way to being able to afford something like a Cirrus.

So, to start us off, here is what I do for a living:

  1. Engineering Program Manager for the Advanced Technology Institute (my day job). Basically we form teams from many large companies and organizations (Raytheon, Ford, NASA,…), write and win proposals for Government or Industry contracts, and manage them. After gaining confidence from reading about how others were making a living, I quit this job in March. But they gave me a raise and allowed me to work on my other businesses in exchange for me staying with them. I was VERY pleased and have a renewed feeling of freedom and autonomy.
  1. President and Janitor of “Office Calls”, a business in which I fix computer problems in small business offices after working hours. This is a wonderfully fulfilling job, due to the immediate gratification I receive from people in need.
  1. Owner of CharlestonArea.com and SantaFeLiving.com. Mostly I use these web sites to attract customers to my website design and hosting business, VeraNova.

Although I work about 80 hours/week at present, I am pleased to report that my wife and I can now actually scrape by on my salary from #1, above, and we are well on our way to becoming airplane owners due to income from #s 2 and 3.

I hope you contribute to this thread and find it as interesting and uplifting as we all did on the ABS.

Sincerely,

Mike Stiteler

Charleston, South Carolina

Mike,

Share with us info about Charleston as many of us, I’m sure, would like to make it an airplane destination. Where to go, what to do? Airports? How’s the weather around Christmas time? Special events at that time? Any teenager activities? Reasonably priced restaurants?

I am an investor and index options trader. I started by selling everything that I owned including my C310 to raise capital. I moved into the cheapest housing that I could find to reduce my outgo to an absolute minimum. Over the last couple of years I have been able to harvest some of my profits. I’ve recently realized my dream of living in Sisters, Oregon. A friend and I are currently shopping for a C182. I plan on placing an order for a new Cirrus as soon as they announce a turbocharged version (hopefully a desiel). I make most of my money through option trading out of my office at home. I work 3 weeks a year and take summers off :slight_smile: M>

Sorry about that. I meant three weeks a month.

Folks,

One of the things we did on the American Bonanza Society email list was share our method of supporting the nasty (and expensive) habit of owning and flying airplanes.

As a newly graduated mechanical engineer (although in my mid 30s, having served as a Navy Submarine enlisted man before heading to college), this was a very enlightening and uplifting discussion. Based on reading what other folks had done to acheive the relatively high level of income required to fly expensive airplanes, I started several businesses on the side and am finally on my way to being able to afford something like a Cirrus.

So, to start us off, here is what I do for a living:

  1. Engineering Program Manager for the Advanced Technology Institute (my day job). Basically we form teams from many large companies and organizations (Raytheon, Ford, NASA,…), write and win proposals for Government or Industry contracts, and manage them. After gaining confidence from reading about how others were making a living, I quit this job in March. But they gave me a raise and allowed me to work on my other businesses in exchange for me staying with them. I was VERY pleased and have a renewed feeling of freedom and autonomy.
  1. President and Janitor of “Office Calls”, a business in which I fix computer problems in small business offices after working hours. This is a wonderfully fulfilling job, due to the immediate gratification I receive from people in need.
  1. Owner of CharlestonArea.com and SantaFeLiving.com. Mostly I use these web sites to attract customers to my website design and hosting business, VeraNova.

Although I work about 80 hours/week at present, I am pleased to report that my wife and I can now actually scrape by on my salary from #1, above, and we are well on our way to becoming airplane owners due to income from #s 2 and 3.

I hope you contribute to this thread and find it as interesting and uplifting as we all did on the ABS.

Sincerely,

Mike Stiteler

Charleston, South Carolina

Gary,

Charleston is a great place to visit year round. We have two primary airports, Charleston International (CHS, which is the civil/military airport) and Charleston Executive (JZI, which is a full-size, but uncontrolled airport about 10 miles from downtown).

During Christmas we have celebrations downtown. Also, there are waterparks, the beach (fishing, swimming, etc.). There are the plantations, the Old Market, historical tours of the old city, really so many things to do.

Charleston has been voted the US’s most well mannered city for at least the last 5 years, as the people are friendly and happy. If you or anyone else on the list would like to visit our fair city, please let me know when and I’ll recommend an itinerary for you.

Sincerely,

Michael

Mike,

Share with us info about Charleston as many of us, I’m sure, would like to make it an airplane destination. Where to go, what to do? Airports? How’s the weather around Christmas time? Special events at that time? Any teenager activities? Reasonably priced restaurants?