stupid GNS430 tricks? (joining a radial)

[Ahem… they promise THIS month… :-)]

I decided to take Derek’s GNS430 simulator test (see earlier messages from him) to dust

off my quickly fading 430 skills and after doing most of the excercises on his list, I remembered a real-life problem that both Dave Katz and I have experienced on several occasions.

Flying from Wattsonville to San Jose, one usually takes an “L” shaped course to avoid some high mountains immediately north of WVI on the direct course. Often we are given a radar-vector south-east, followed by “join the Salinas (SNS) 347 radial, resume own navigation” (which would send us to GILRO, but they often vector us NW before we get to GILRO) to short-cut going all the way down to Salinas.

The common “proper” answer to doing this in the GNS430 is to figure out why you were given the radial, and just plug in the destination waypoint instead. Other folks just tune in the VOR and do it the old fashioned way.

In this particular case, if I were to proceed direct to the next WPT (GILRO), it would be a significantly different course than the join.

I want to fly my current track, intercept a radial several miles from the VOR, join it, and track outbound to a distant waypoint.

What’s the “proper” way to do this without relying on the VOR?

What’s the “proper” way to do this without relying on the VOR?

Here are a few suggestions from a three dimensionally challenged biologist. Don’t know if these are “proper,” or the best answers, but while flying assigned heading

You could enter a 2-waypoint flightplan: SNS --> GILRO, fly to the pink line, and go to GILRO.

Or, you could enter “direct GILRO,” display the “bearing to waypoint” function on the NAV page or on the map, fly until the bearing to GILRO is 347 degrees, then go direct GILRO.

Or, you could keep entering “direct GILRO” until it says approximately 347, then fly it. This is what I have done, and it works even if you feel like a jerk punching the keys so frequently…

Finally, you could go to the NRST VOR page, fly until the bearing to/from SNS is 167/347 degrees, then go direct GILRO; OR use NRST INTERSECTION the same way.

Regarding this last alternative, you can use it to check your VORs every 30 days. Any position defined by an IFR GPS fix should qualify as a “known waypoint,” so wherever you happen to be sitting on the ground (or even in the air, although the readings keep changing) and can receive a VOR, just use the NRST VOR page to determine your radial, compare the VOR readings, and you’re set!

Happy New Year, and best wishes with your new SR22! Kevin

Here is my suggestion.

On the 10th page of the WPT group (last page), there is a screen that allows you to select a User Waypoint.

The 430 will allow you to enter a custom User Waypoint.

On this screen you can enter a VOR, Radial and a Distance from.

Added bonus, if the VOR you want to intercept the radial from is fairly close, it will should appear on the screen as a waypoint. You will need to add the radial and distance from the VOR to intercept.

When done and entered, move the cursor back to the User Waypoint name (default is MAP?, first part of the screen) and hit the D (direct) button.

I did this on 430 sim with success but have zero practical experience with the 430. Hopefully this will change June or July! :wink: In the meantime, try this and see if it is not too clumsy. A better approach may be to ask for a Direct to an intersection on the radial if it a charted route.

BTW, for you current users of the 430. Are you guys (and gals) loading a flight plan into the GPS or are you just adding waypoints as your fly?

I fly a 210 with RNAV and a portable GPS. I have found that loading a flight plan into either is a huge waste of time because I have never been able to complete the flight using the whole plan and end up abandoning it about half way through a flight (of any distance). Thoughts or comments?

Mark

I decided to take Derek’s GNS430 simulator test (see earlier messages from him) to dust

off my quickly fading 430 skills and after doing most of the excercises on his list, I remembered a real-life problem that both Dave Katz and I have experienced on several occasions.

Flying from Wattsonville to San Jose, one usually takes an “L” shaped course to avoid some high mountains immediately north of WVI on the direct course. Often we are given a radar-vector south-east, followed by “join the Salinas (SNS) 347 radial, resume own navigation” (which would send us to GILRO, but they often vector us NW before we get to GILRO) to short-cut going all the way down to Salinas.

The common “proper” answer to doing this in the GNS430 is to figure out why you were given the radial, and just plug in the destination waypoint instead. Other folks just tune in the VOR and do it the old fashioned way.

In this particular case, if I were to proceed direct to the next WPT (GILRO), it would be a significantly different course than the join.

I want to fly my current track, intercept a radial several miles from the VOR, join it, and track outbound to a distant waypoint.

What’s the “proper” way to do this without relying on the VOR?

I want to fly my current track, intercept a radial several miles from the VOR, join it, and track outbound to a distant waypoint.

What’s the “proper” way to do this without relying on the VOR?

In particular, the ATC instruction is usually “fly heading 040, intercept the SNS 347 radial, own nav” as they don’t want you to run into the Antenna of Death if you fly direct GILRO. Furthermore, the original clearance was “WVI published departure procedure, SNS, GILRO, as filed.”

There are two aspects of this–what does this radial mean in terms of a flight plan, and how do I get there from here?

Usually when you get “join the xyz radial” what you’re really doing is joining a leg that defines an intersection. In this case, the SNS 347 is one of the radials that defines GILRO. If you had set up your flight plan as KWVI SNS GILRO KPAO then you’d be all set–highlight GILRO, press the ->D button twice (“join flight plan leg”), set the heading bug to 040, press HDG+NAV on your S-Tec 55, and the plane will fly 040 and then roll out onto the SNS->GILRO leg (which is the SNS 347).

If you wanted to be quick and dirty about it, dial up NRST VOR, select SNS, hit ->D, set OBS mode, and dial up 347 on your HSI, then set the heading bug and press HDG+NAV as above.

If the radial is truly out of the blue, you could edit your flight plan to add the two waypoints that lie on the specified radial, then join that leg.

Or you could do what I did, which was to tune in the VOR and vow to reread the manual again. :wink:

What’s the “proper” way to do this without >relying on the VOR?

I don’t know about proper way, but if your object is to use the autopilot, then the following works on the simulator:

Set up a direct to the VOR, press the OBS and dial the desired radial to the VOR, set the autopilot on NAV. You will automatically intercept the desired radial toward the VOR.

If you want to intercept from you current heading, (you presumeably already have the heading bug set and your autopilot set on HDG), follow the previous steps but do not switch to NAV until the CDI comes close to centering.

I would refer you to page 53 of the GNS430 pilot guide for a possible easy solution while using the direct to navigation mode… Specifying a course to a waypoint

Press the Direct to key and enter your desired destination waypoint (in this case GILRO is convenient but any waypoint on the 347 radial will do) press enter ONCE. Rotate the large knob to highlight the CRS field and enter your desired course to the waypoint (in this case 347 degrees). Press enter again and voila!! the Garmin should define the course as you and ATC would like to fly it. If using an autopilot that is sophisticated enough to allow you to continue on present heading till the radial is intercepted the plane will fly the intercept itself. For the less fortunate (myself included) a switch from HDG to NAV mode will be required once the radial is intercepted.

I suspect there are several other ways of skinning this cat.

[Ahem… they promise THIS month… :-)]

I decided to take Derek’s GNS430 simulator test (see earlier messages from him) to dust

off my quickly fading 430 skills and after doing most of the excercises on his list, I remembered a real-life problem that both Dave Katz and I have experienced on several occasions.

Flying from Wattsonville to San Jose, one usually takes an “L” shaped course to avoid some high mountains immediately north of WVI on the direct course. Often we are given a radar-vector south-east, followed by “join the Salinas (SNS) 347 radial, resume own navigation” (which would send us to GILRO, but they often vector us NW before we get to GILRO) to short-cut going all the way down to Salinas.

The common “proper” answer to doing this in the GNS430 is to figure out why you were given the radial, and just plug in the destination waypoint instead. Other folks just tune in the VOR and do it the old fashioned way.

In this particular case, if I were to proceed direct to the next WPT (GILRO), it would be a significantly different course than the join.

I want to fly my current track, intercept a radial several miles from the VOR, join it, and track outbound to a distant waypoint.

What’s the “proper” way to do this without relying on the VOR?

[Ahem… they promise THIS month… :-)]

I decided to take Derek’s GNS430 simulator test (see earlier messages from him) to dust

off my quickly fading 430 skills and after doing most of the excercises on his list, I remembered a real-life problem that both Dave Katz and I have experienced on several occasions.

Flying from Wattsonville to San Jose, one usually takes an “L” shaped course to avoid some high mountains immediately north of WVI on the direct course. Often we are given a radar-vector south-east, followed by “join the Salinas (SNS) 347 radial, resume own navigation” (which would send us to GILRO, but they often vector us NW before we get to GILRO) to short-cut going all the way down to Salinas.

The common “proper” answer to doing this in the GNS430 is to figure out why you were given the radial, and just plug in the destination waypoint instead. Other folks just tune in the VOR and do it the old fashioned way.

In this particular case, if I were to proceed direct to the next WPT (GILRO), it would be a significantly different course than the join.

I want to fly my current track, intercept a radial several miles from the VOR, join it, and track outbound to a distant waypoint.

What’s the “proper” way to do this without relying on the VOR?

Paul -

I end up flying the radial - L quite frequently in crowded NY Class B and have adopted the Keep It Simple approach for two reasons:

  • the exact clearance always changes in the air

  • there is little / no time available to work sophisticated solutions with the GPS. Besides, I should be looking out the window.

So, here is the scenario I fly, for what it is worth. Two cases:

  1. Departing KTEB. Vectors for departure to COL VOR.

a. Set flightplan KTEB - COL …

b. After several 360’s to climb above KEWR approach / departure traffic, usually get FLY HEADING x (let say 260 this time) to intercept COL RADIAL 350 INBOUND.

c. Heading (and BUG) to 260. Usually with AP HEADING mode to give me more eyes outside time. GPS will continue to show direct course heading to COL.

d. After established 260 and looking out the window to avoid the heavy metal all around, set the GPS to OBS via HSI to 170 (350 inbound). Takes about 1 second. Leave the AP on HEADING.

e. MAP now displays 350 radial inbound to COL. AP continues to fly 260. Monitor CDI or GPS version for distance to intercept. At roughly 1 mile from intercept, turn inbound to intercept radial (or just press NAV on the AP and let it do the intercept.

  1. If there really was a VOR instead of HEADING clearance, I’d modify the above only slightly. Lets assume its inbound to TEB then TEB 260 radial to intercept COL 350 radial. If you REALLY know the clearance ahead of time, set up the user defined waypoint per other posts this message. But if its on the fly in crowded airspace, I’d

a. Flight pllan already shows TEB - COL. Inbound to TEB would go to OBS 5 miles out. OBS to inbound course TEB. Then, about 1 mile out from TEB OBS to 260 (still TEB since waypoint will not sequence in OBS mode). If on AP, it would intercept the outbound radial. GPS waypoint holds at TEB.

b. Once established 260 outbound, set HEADING BUG to match outbound heading (now will correct for cross wind). AP to heading mode. No longer strictly tracking radial, but since already oncourse, with wind correction made and a likely short leg, this matters a lot less than having time to look outside.

c. OBS off. GPS will sequence to COL. But AP will continue to fly the HEADING BUG. Reset OBS 170. MAP now displays 350 radial inbound to COL. Monitor CDI or GPS version of CDI for distance to intercept. At roughly 1 mile from intercept, turn inbound to intercept radial (or just press NAV on the AP and let it do the intercept.

Again, its quick, its pretty much the same with either a heading or radial outbound clearance. Lots of time to look out the window.

Hope the above “low tech” solution is useful.

I want to fly my current track, intercept a radial several miles from the VOR, join it, and track outbound to a distant waypoint.

What’s the “proper” way to do this without relying on the VOR?
Distilling all the answers given here, plus some fiddling, I think I have the “best” answer. Doesn’t require that you know the waypoint you are tracking to, only the outbound radial, and minimizes head down time.
Select Direct SNS (either by dialing it up or use Nearest VOR). Press OBS then select the desired outbound radial (e.g. 347). The GPS will now intercept the radial outbound. If your autopilot is good enough, it will do all the work, otherwise turn to the intercept heading before engaging nav mode. That’s it. Basically the GPS will try to get to SNS by flying away from it.

The exact sequence would be: rotate big knob far right to select Nearest page; rotate little knob to select VOR page; press knob for cursor; if required rotate big knob to highlight SNS (should be first anyway); press DIRECT ENT ENT. Press OBS and dial in radial on HSI. turn to heading as appropriate and engage NAV mode on autopilot.

Instead of using OBS mode you could dial in the course on the DIRECT page, but this is fiddlier and you will still want to set the HSI course pointer anyway.

Everyone, thank you very much, as we can see from the various responses, there is at least 3 ways to do everything in that GNS430. :slight_smile:

Paul

I’ve been flying with a Garmin 300XL IFR cert. in my Cessna. If GILRO is on the 347 radial, I would enter a direct to GILRO course then engage the OBS/CDI mode, not sure of the proper term for the 430’s (Hold on my unit) dial in the 347 radial on the OBS and fly the heading until intercepted. You can forget about the VOR. Vectors to join an airway then to a waypoint work the same way. One of the really great thing about these GPS machines (IMHO) is that any waypoint can be treated as a VOR with the OBS. For example if I want to join an extended centerline to approach an aiport miles out, while the airport is the current waypoint I dial in the runway heading, press hold (or whatever is used on the 430’s) and intercept the ‘radial’. My map even draws the radial on the screen so I can see when I’m approaching the course. This also works for holds to an intersection, you can see your inbound course and your position right there on the screen!!

When I first figured this out on my unit last year I thought to myself this is really cheating, especially when it comes to holds…

Cheers,

Paul

What’s the “proper” way to do this without relying on the VOR?

Here are a few suggestions from a three dimensionally challenged biologist. Don’t know if these are “proper,” or the best answers, but while flying assigned heading

You could enter a 2-waypoint flightplan: SNS --> GILRO, fly to the pink line, and go to GILRO.

Or, you could enter “direct GILRO,” display the “bearing to waypoint” function on the NAV page or on the map, fly until the bearing to GILRO is 347 degrees, then go direct GILRO.

Or, you could keep entering “direct GILRO” until it says approximately 347, then fly it. This is what I have done, and it works even if you feel like a jerk punching the keys so frequently…

Finally, you could go to the NRST VOR page, fly until the bearing to/from SNS is 167/347 degrees, then go direct GILRO; OR use NRST INTERSECTION the same way.

Regarding this last alternative, you can use it to check your VORs every 30 days. Any position defined by an IFR GPS fix should qualify as a “known waypoint,” so wherever you happen to be sitting on the ground (or even in the air, although the readings keep changing) and can receive a VOR, just use the NRST VOR page to determine your radial, compare the VOR readings, and you’re set!

Happy New Year, and best wishes with your new SR22! Kevin

Page 107 in the 430 manual.

Here is my suggestion.

On the 10th page of the WPT group (last page), there is a screen that allows you to select a User Waypoint.

The 430 will allow you to enter a custom User Waypoint.

On this screen you can enter a VOR, Radial and a Distance from.

Added bonus, if the VOR you want to intercept the radial from is fairly close, it will should appear on the screen as a waypoint. You will need to add the radial and distance from the VOR to intercept.

When done and entered, move the cursor back to the User Waypoint name (default is MAP?, first part of the screen) and hit the D (direct) button.

I did this on 430 sim with success but have zero practical experience with the 430. Hopefully this will change June or July! :wink: In the meantime, try this and see if it is not too clumsy. A better approach may be to ask for a Direct to an intersection on the radial if it a charted route.

BTW, for you current users of the 430. Are you guys (and gals) loading a flight plan into the GPS or are you just adding waypoints as your fly?

I fly a 210 with RNAV and a portable GPS. I have found that loading a flight plan into either is a huge waste of time because I have never been able to complete the flight using the whole plan and end up abandoning it about half way through a flight (of any distance). Thoughts or comments?

Mark

I decided to take Derek’s GNS430 simulator test (see earlier messages from him) to dust

off my quickly fading 430 skills and after doing most of the excercises on his list, I remembered a real-life problem that both Dave Katz and I have experienced on several occasions.

Flying from Wattsonville to San Jose, one usually takes an “L” shaped course to avoid some high mountains immediately north of WVI on the direct course. Often we are given a radar-vector south-east, followed by “join the Salinas (SNS) 347 radial, resume own navigation” (which would send us to GILRO, but they often vector us NW before we get to GILRO) to short-cut going all the way down to Salinas.

The common “proper” answer to doing this in the GNS430 is to figure out why you were given the radial, and just plug in the destination waypoint instead. Other folks just tune in the VOR and do it the old fashioned way.

In this particular case, if I were to proceed direct to the next WPT (GILRO), it would be a significantly different course than the join.

I want to fly my current track, intercept a radial several miles from the VOR, join it, and track outbound to a distant waypoint.

What’s the “proper” way to do this without relying on the VOR?

I fly a 210 with RNAV and a portable GPS. I have found that loading a flight plan into either is a huge waste of time because I have never been able to complete the flight using the whole plan and end up abandoning it about half way through a flight (of any distance). Thoughts or comments?

Mark

I currently ‘slum’ it using a handheld Apollo predecus, whcih I incidnetly love. Anyway, I almost always pre-program the entire flight plan.

I have several reasons. First, I find it easier to change a waypoint than to necessarily enter a new one.

Secondly, I only program it after I receive my clearance (unless I will use a clearance void time. IOf there are changes after that, they are usually minor and typically all you have to do is delete individual points as ATC gives you a Direct to clearance. thge opnly time this is a wast is when you get close to an unfamililar destination or if you get a rerout enroute. Once I’ve flown a route a few time, i learn the local ATC’s preferences and will file for them in advance or at least pre-program them.

Third, this method leaves less ‘head in cockpit’ time compared to entering a new waypoint each time.

Fourth, my GPS allows me to set an alarm which shows distance or time from the waypoint (programable). This alarm also shows the next course allowing me to begin the turn before I hit the waypoint and therefore staying in the airway.

Finally, the GPS gives me ETA and ETE to both the active waypoint and the final destination, but this is only useful if you have a full plan entered.

Here is my suggestion.

On the 10th page of the WPT group (last page), there is a screen that allows you to select a User Waypoint.

The 430 will allow you to enter a custom User Waypoint.

In this case, adding a user waypoint won’t help, since the intersection (GILRO) is already a waypoint on the SNS 347 radial, and the crux of the problem is that you cannot fly direct to the waypoint without ending up in a smoking crater (the essence of low-altitude IFR!)

Once you become adept at it, putting a flight plan into the 430 is pretty easy, and it’s a big help when IFR. I always do it for IFR and for long VFR trips.

Page 107 in the 430 manual.

Here is my suggestion.

On the 10th page of the WPT group (last page), there is a screen that allows you to select a User Waypoint.

The 430 will allow you to enter a custom User Waypoint.

On this screen you can enter a VOR, Radial and a Distance from.

Added bonus, if the VOR you want to intercept the radial from is fairly close, it will should appear on the screen as a waypoint. You will need to add the radial and distance from the VOR to intercept.

When done and entered, move the cursor back to the User Waypoint name (default is MAP?, first part of the screen) and hit the D (direct) button.

I did this on 430 sim with success but have zero practical experience with the 430. Hopefully this will change June or July! :wink: In the meantime, try this and see if it is not too clumsy. A better approach may be to ask for a Direct to an intersection on the radial if it a charted route.

BTW, for you current users of the 430. Are you guys (and gals) loading a flight plan into the GPS or are you just adding waypoints as your fly?

I fly a 210 with RNAV and a portable GPS. I have found that loading a flight plan into either is a huge waste of time because I have never been able to complete the flight using the whole plan and end up abandoning it about half way through a flight (of any distance). Thoughts or comments?

Mark

I decided to take Derek’s GNS430 simulator test (see earlier messages from him) to dust

off my quickly fading 430 skills and after doing most of the excercises on his list, I remembered a real-life problem that both Dave Katz and I have experienced on several occasions.

Flying from Wattsonville to San Jose, one usually takes an “L” shaped course to avoid some high mountains immediately north of WVI on the direct course. Often we are given a radar-vector south-east, followed by “join the Salinas (SNS) 347 radial, resume own navigation” (which would send us to GILRO, but they often vector us NW before we get to GILRO) to short-cut going all the way down to Salinas.

The common “proper” answer to doing this in the GNS430 is to figure out why you were given the radial, and just plug in the destination waypoint instead. Other folks just tune in the VOR and do it the old fashioned way.

In this particular case, if I were to proceed direct to the next WPT (GILRO), it would be a significantly different course than the join.

I want to fly my current track, intercept a radial several miles from the VOR, join it, and track outbound to a distant waypoint.

What’s the “proper” way to do this without relying on the VOR?

Perhaps I have a newer version of the Garmin GNS430 Pilot’s Guide and Reference book. July 2000/ 190-00140-00 Rev.F

I received this FREE along with the CD-ROM from Garmin. Page 113:

"The GNS430 allows you to create a new user waypoint at a defined radial and distance from your present position. To reference your present position, follow the steps above:

  1. With the user waypoint page displayed, press the small right knob to activate the cursor.

  2. Use the small and large right knobs to enter a name for the new waypoint and press ENT.

  3. Rotate the large right knob to highlight the first reference waypoint (REF WPT) field.

  4. Press CLR. P.POS will appear in the reference waypoint (REF WPT) field to indicate that radial and distance information will reference your present position. The second reference waypoint field (REF WPT) is a temporary reference only - not a referenece that will be stored with the user waypoint. By default, this field will display a radial from the nearest VOR. However, you can select any waypoint - by identifier - to use as a reference in this field. Press ENT

  5. The cursor moves to the radial (RAD) field. Use the small and large right knobs to enter the radial from the reference waypoint to the new user waypoint. Press ENT.

  6. The cursor moves to the distance (DIS) field . Use the small and large right knobs to enter the distance from the reference waypoint to the new user waypoint. Press ENT.

  7. Rotate the large right knob to highlight “Create?” and press ENT.

  8. Press the small right knob to remove the flashing cursor.

You just HAVE TO GET the User Guide, because it is loaded with useful information, along with the simulator software. Like someone wrote, the MOST complex part of an SR2x is the GNS430. If you are proficient in its use, you can chop very valuable time off in the transition training time, AND spend more time looking out the window. We have to face it, all these great gizmos in the cockpit will be worthless if a HUMAN EYE is not looking out the windows most of the time! Train and train on the simulator, create ATC changes along the way for yourself, so when the time comes, you really need to push only a few buttons, not pore over the pages and pages of info.

For 8 years I’m flying with Garmins and moving maps (Argus 3000/7000), and on the first flight on the ILS, I realized how little I know of the new electronic buttons flying. I borrowed a Garmin from my avionics dealer for 10 days, hooked it up at home, and wore calluses on my fingers turning the knobs. But I learned it well. Good Luck with the BUTTONS! Happy New Year!

In this case, adding a user waypoint won’t help, since the intersection (GILRO) is already a waypoint on the SNS 347 radial, and the crux of the problem is that you cannot fly direct to the waypoint without ending up in a smoking crater (the essence of low-altitude IFR!)

Once you become adept at it, putting a flight plan into the 430 is pretty easy, and it’s a big help when IFR. I always do it for IFR and for long VFR trips.

I am unfamiliar with the area in question and I don’t have access to charts for it either.

However, ATC has two choices when they issue the directive. Steer heading of “?” until you intercept the 347 radial outbound or they can tell you to fly direct to the VOR and then outbound on the 347 radial.

If they give you a heading you can interpolate the distance from the VOR to intersect and enter that point (VOR, Radial and Distance)as a User Waypoint. A bit tedious but workable. I think the more elegant solution is the one you posted as a direct response to Paul.

Also…

Thanks for the advice on the flight plan and entering prior to departure on the GPS. I recall having most of my best layed plans changed prior to receiving a clearance or within 50 miles of a big terminal (ie Atlanta Class B when trying to get to PDK) so I see this as workable and not too tedious. Particularly since most of the flights will be direct and the arrival and final procedures are installed in the 430. Once in the terminal area and being vectored to final as is often the case, then the GPS becomes the ulitmate “where the hell am I in relation to the airport” device.

Ever caught a controller give you a bum heading? I have and kept my self from being purched a top a 3000 foot tower (I was at 2400 feet) and also when “vectored” 15 miles to sea before gently reminding the controller that it was too cold to swim. He then turned me back to intercept the ILS.

All hail the GPS…

When I have dual 430’s (June/July cross my fingers), I think I will load the anticipated flight plan into both units (using crossfill) and then use the second unit as a “Direct To” in case of a Flight Plan change enroute.

Also, I have been training on the 430 sim and feel dialing real buttons will beat the heck out using the computuer mouse to enter data. I still find myself trying to type in waypoints on the computer screen to no avail. Kind of funny as the sim just sits there and mocks me, flashing its cursor in Morris Code saying “Buy the GPS 430 for Dummies book, dummy”.

However, I am tickled to death that I can take the speed down to zero and solve a problem midstream. As with programs like Flight Simulator 2000, a “Pause” button on a real airplane would be a great safety feature. Perhaps it could weigh less than the parachute.

If someone figures out how to do it, let me know and I’ll throw some money into the startup. :wink:

Mark

Set up a direct to the VOR, press the OBS and dial the desired radial to the VOR, set the autopilot on NAV.
To expand on this, if you set up in the flight plan SNS GILRO, fly heading while being vectored, then select 347 on the HSI, press the OBS button, turn to your desired intercept heading. Now press the OBS button again and the flight plan will sequence to GILRO (even though you never got to SNS).
Or, the other way if you have set up the flight plan SNS-GILRO, is to press FPL, press the little know to activate the cursor, scroll to GILRO, then press DIRECT DIRECT ENT (not direct ent ent) - this will activate the leg of the plan, and you will then intercept the radial outbound. Pressing direct ent ent would fly directly from your present position to GILRO, not what you want. The first way, using the OBS button, is probably easier, since you don’t have to get into the FPL page. But it can be used to intercept legs other than the next one.

With respect to entering a flight plan, I usually just use Direct-to the first waypoint, then enter the rest of the flight plan after takeoff. If I’m going VFR, I will usually just use Direct-to for each leg, since these are usually sight-seeing. I always file IFR for long trips.