sr22 destroyed in springfield mo.

per FAA accident site 6/18 Cirrus SR22 # 739BB cleared to land, caution wake turbulence, landed and departed runway. A/C destroyed. no fatalities

per FAA accident site 6/18 Cirrus SR22 # 739BB cleared to land, caution wake turbulence, landed and departed runway. A/C destroyed. no fatalities

What is the site address, please?

Hope everyone is indeed okay.

Dean

First off, I’m glad to read that everyone aboard will recover.

I hope we get to learn exactly what happened to cause loss of directional control.

For those who have flown both: Does the SR22 landing technique differ in any material respect from the SR20?

George Savage

SR22 #95

What is the site address, please?

Hope everyone is indeed okay.

Dean

http://www.faa.gov/avr/aai/A_0618_N.TXT FAA Accident Site.

I hope they all walked away…

Here’s the report:

**** 6/18/01 Preliminary Accident/Incident Data Record 30 ****

A. Type: A Mid Air: N Missing: N Entry date: 6/18/01
From: SOUTHERN REGION OPERATIONS CENTER

B. Reg. No.: 739BB M/M: SR22 Desc: CIRRUS SR22

Activity: Pleasure Phase: Landing GA-A/C: General Aviation

Descr: AIRCRAFT ON FINAL TO RWY 20, CLRD TO LAND NUMBER TWO, FOLLOW SF14
ON A WIDE RIGHT BASE, CAUTION WAKE TURBULENCE, TOUCHED DOWN APPROX
1000-1500 FROM APCH END NEAR TWY B, BOUNCED A FEW TIMES, VEERED TO
LEFT CROSSING SOD AREA, TAXIWAY, ANOTHER SOD AREA AND IMPACTING A
PARKED DISABLED AIRCRAFT, SPRINGFIELD, MO

WX: 1854Z VRB06KT 10SM CLR 30/14 A3022

Damage: Destroyed

C2. Injury Data: # Crew: 2 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk: Y

             # Pass: 2 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk: Y

             # Grnd: Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk:

D. Location. City: SPRINGFIELD State: MO Country: US

E. Event Date: 6/16/01 Time: 1938

F. Invest Coverage. IIC: Reg/DO: SO15 DO City: ORLANDO

DO State: FL Others:
G. Flt Handling. Dep Pt: CHARITON, IA Dep Date: 6/16/01 Time: 1816

Dest: SPRINGFIELD, MO Last Radio Cont: 1930/12 MILE FINAL Flt Plan: UNK

Last Clearance: CLRD TO LAND WX Briefing: U

Other:

  • Mike.

The Springfield Leader had this to say about the incident:

"The crash occurred around 3:30 p.m. when Barbara Barquin, a pilot in training flying in from Duluth, Minn., attempted to land her SA Cirrus aircraft, Cyr said.

The plane bounced from the main runway to another runway, hopping over a grassy lane between the two, Cyr said. At some point, the landing gear collapsed, he said.

The plane then veered over onto another runway and hit a plane sitting there. That aircraft, which was tied down, is used for training at the airport and didnÂ’t have engines or fuel on board.

“If the plane had caught fire, it would have been … different,” Cyr said."

CAUTION WAKE TURBULENCE!!! NEVER underestimate the vortex of a large aircraft! It can kill you. I always go around after a big jet lands rather than land behind one. I also approach 100’-200’ above the normal glidescope after any heavy aircraft has landed, and I make sure I touch down 200’-300’ further down the runway. Same thing on takeoff. Tell the tower you want to wait an extra min or two. They can not make you take off. ALWAYS lift off before the point the big boy lifted off and move you climb toward the windward side of his track.

Hope those people are OK.

Denis

What is the site address, please?

Hope everyone is indeed okay.

Dean

http://www.faa.gov/avr/aai/A_0618_N.TXT FAA Accident Site.

I hope they all walked away…

Here’s the report:

**** 6/18/01 Preliminary Accident/Incident Data Record 30 ****

A. Type: A Mid Air: N Missing: N Entry date: 6/18/01
From: SOUTHERN REGION OPERATIONS CENTER

B. Reg. No.: 739BB M/M: SR22 Desc: CIRRUS SR22

Activity: Pleasure Phase: Landing GA-A/C: General Aviation

Descr: AIRCRAFT ON FINAL TO RWY 20, CLRD TO LAND NUMBER TWO, FOLLOW SF14
ON A WIDE RIGHT BASE, CAUTION WAKE TURBULENCE, TOUCHED DOWN APPROX
1000-1500 FROM APCH END NEAR TWY B, BOUNCED A FEW TIMES, VEERED TO
LEFT CROSSING SOD AREA, TAXIWAY, ANOTHER SOD AREA AND IMPACTING A
PARKED DISABLED AIRCRAFT, SPRINGFIELD, MO

WX: 1854Z VRB06KT 10SM CLR 30/14 A3022

Damage: Destroyed

C2. Injury Data: # Crew: 2 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk: Y

Pass: 2 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk: Y

Grnd: Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk:

D. Location. City: SPRINGFIELD State: MO Country: US

E. Event Date: 6/16/01 Time: 1938

F. Invest Coverage. IIC: Reg/DO: SO15 DO City: ORLANDO

DO State: FL Others:
G. Flt Handling. Dep Pt: CHARITON, IA Dep Date: 6/16/01 Time: 1816

Dest: SPRINGFIELD, MO Last Radio Cont: 1930/12 MILE FINAL Flt Plan: UNK

Last Clearance: CLRD TO LAND WX Briefing: U

Other:

  • Mike.

CLRD TO LAND NUMBER TWO, FOLLOW SF14

What’s an SF14?

  • Mike.

I was there when Barbara and her husband were getting their training, sobering, I also fly last year on fathers day with Doug Koehler. I hope they are OK. I thought one of the Cirrus guys was going with them and getting dropped off in MO? Rick

The Springfield Leader had this to say about the incident:

"The crash occurred around 3:30 p.m. when Barbara Barquin, a pilot in training flying in from Duluth, Minn., attempted to land her SA Cirrus aircraft, Cyr said.

The plane bounced from the main runway to another runway, hopping over a grassy lane between the two, Cyr said. At some point, the landing gear collapsed, he said.

The plane then veered over onto another runway and hit a plane sitting there. That aircraft, which was tied down, is used for training at the airport and didnÂ’t have engines or fuel on board.

“If the plane had caught fire, it would have been … different,” Cyr said."

I was there when Barbara and her husband were getting their training, sobering, I also fly last year on fathers day with Doug Koehler. I hope they are OK. I thought one of the Cirrus guys was going with them and getting dropped off in MO? Rick

Rick,

That’s correct. According to the Springfield News-Leader article, Clayton Snowalter from Cirrus was on board. You can read the article at http://news.ozarksnow.com/news/crash061701.htmlhttp://news.ozarksnow.com/news/crash061701.html.

— Roger

I was there when Barbara and her husband were getting their training, sobering, I also fly last year on fathers day with Doug Koehler. I hope they are OK. I thought one of the Cirrus guys was going with them and getting dropped off in MO? Rick

Rick,

That’s correct. According to the Springfield News-Leader article, Clayton Snowalter from Cirrus was on board. You can read the article at http://news.ozarksnow.com/news/crash061701.htmlhttp://news.ozarksnow.com/news/crash061701.html.

— Roger

I’ve been to the airport a number of times. The news reports were inconsistent with the FAA report and inconsistent with logic. Hitting a second plane (no engines on the plane) sitting on another runway? I don’t think so. To the left of runway 20 is the FBO. That’s where the impact apparently took place.

Was the WA instructor in the front or back?

I’m not an especially experienced pilot (425 hours; insturment rated) so I’m very mindful that without caution and care, I could be in the same situation. This I’ll say, however, having good experience during the “bouncing” phase of my landing technique, which thankfully seems to be behind me. (Thank’s for all the input on this forum, and thanks to Ed.) If the SR20, and presumably the 22, bounces, it doesn’t react like my old Warrior. The bad news: the bouncing turns into porpoising. The good news: there’s plenty of power to do a go around. My ace co-pilot and Duluth training partner suggested a one bounce and go-around policy, which has served me well. No one is sure exactly what happened at Springfield, and this may not apply to that situation. However, as a Cirrus pilot with extensive bouncing experience (aggh!), I suggest this as good “policy.”

I picked up my SR22 last week, and spent 9 hours of ground instruction with Joey and Barb. I hope they’re okay.

I too was instructed by Wings Aloft to initiate a go-around if even one bounce occurs.

Dan

I was there when Barbara and her husband were getting their training, sobering, I also fly last year on fathers day with Doug Koehler. I hope they are OK. I thought one of the Cirrus guys was going with them and getting dropped off in MO? Rick

Rick,

That’s correct. According to the Springfield News-Leader article, Clayton Snowalter from Cirrus was on board. You can read the article at http://news.ozarksnow.com/news/crash061701.htmlhttp://news.ozarksnow.com/news/crash061701.html.

— Roger

I’ve been to the airport a number of times. The news reports were inconsistent with the FAA report and inconsistent with logic. Hitting a second plane (no engines on the plane) sitting on another runway? I don’t think so. To the left of runway 20 is the FBO. That’s where the impact apparently took place.

Was the WA instructor in the front or back?

I’m not an especially experienced pilot (425 hours; insturment rated) so I’m very mindful that without caution and care, I could be in the same situation. This I’ll say, however, having good experience during the “bouncing” phase of my landing technique, which thankfully seems to be behind me. (Thank’s for all the input on this forum, and thanks to Ed.) If the SR20, and presumably the 22, bounces, it doesn’t react like my old Warrior. The bad news: the bouncing turns into porpoising. The good news: there’s plenty of power to do a go around. My ace co-pilot and Duluth training partner suggested a one bounce and go-around policy, which has served me well. No one is sure exactly what happened at Springfield, and this may not apply to that situation. However, as a Cirrus pilot with extensive bouncing experience (aggh!), I suggest this as good “policy.”

Sounds like a good idea. My rule in a C172 was two bounces and go around. I have done two bounces in an SR20 before going around. I think I will limit it to one in the future. - Jim DeVries

I too was instructed by Wings Aloft to initiate a go-around if even one bounce occurs.

Dan

Awful, glad they are OK. WT is not the only way to do this. Not to be contrary, but the Cirrus’s do have a tendancy to porpoise if you let the front wheel touch first. This is exactly what could happen in a fully developed porpoise also (having done that during training - don’t ask). We Cirrus drivers need to be cautious about speed management in the approach phase.

My experience in the 22 is it acts just like my Grumman Tiger. Tigers have same gear and the same exact behavior. It shows in the accident data btw (I will bet over time it shows up in Cirrus Accident data as well), but for different reasons. The Tiger has a long nose gear relative to the mains and is easy to bump first if you do not flare fairly hard. With the Cirrus, if you are on the numbers, when you flare you are running out of up elevator. Get much slower too far off the runway at zero power and bingo, you won’t be able to hold up the nose - porpoise will start and they happen in a split second.

I love my 22, but frankly think the SR needs a little more up elevator. Margin there is a little thin. I suspect that the new certification FAR’s, require that to minimize stall entry possiblities. Just something for the Pilot to be aware of and manage.

Roger
N706CD, SR22

CAUTION WAKE TURBULENCE!!! NEVER underestimate the vortex of a large aircraft! It can kill you. I always go around after a big jet lands rather than land behind one. I also approach 100’-200’ above the normal glidescope after any heavy aircraft has landed, and I make sure I touch down 200’-300’ further down the runway. Same thing on takeoff. Tell the tower you want to wait an extra min or two. They can not make you take off. ALWAYS lift off before the point the big boy lifted off and move you climb toward the windward side of his track.

Hope those people are OK.

Denis

What is the site address, please?

Hope everyone is indeed okay.

Dean

http://www.faa.gov/avr/aai/A_0618_N.TXT FAA Accident Site.

I hope they all walked away…

Here’s the report:

**** 6/18/01 Preliminary Accident/Incident Data Record 30 ****

A. Type: A Mid Air: N Missing: N Entry date: 6/18/01
From: SOUTHERN REGION OPERATIONS CENTER

B. Reg. No.: 739BB M/M: SR22 Desc: CIRRUS SR22

Activity: Pleasure Phase: Landing GA-A/C: General Aviation

Descr: AIRCRAFT ON FINAL TO RWY 20, CLRD TO LAND NUMBER TWO, FOLLOW SF14
ON A WIDE RIGHT BASE, CAUTION WAKE TURBULENCE, TOUCHED DOWN APPROX
1000-1500 FROM APCH END NEAR TWY B, BOUNCED A FEW TIMES, VEERED TO
LEFT CROSSING SOD AREA, TAXIWAY, ANOTHER SOD AREA AND IMPACTING A
PARKED DISABLED AIRCRAFT, SPRINGFIELD, MO

WX: 1854Z VRB06KT 10SM CLR 30/14 A3022

Damage: Destroyed

C2. Injury Data: # Crew: 2 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk: Y

Pass: 2 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk: Y

Grnd: Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk:

D. Location. City: SPRINGFIELD State: MO Country: US

E. Event Date: 6/16/01 Time: 1938

F. Invest Coverage. IIC: Reg/DO: SO15 DO City: ORLANDO

DO State: FL Others:
G. Flt Handling. Dep Pt: CHARITON, IA Dep Date: 6/16/01 Time: 1816

Dest: SPRINGFIELD, MO Last Radio Cont: 1930/12 MILE FINAL Flt Plan: UNK

Last Clearance: CLRD TO LAND WX Briefing: U

Other:

  • Mike.

Awful, glad they are OK. WT is not the only way to do this. Not to be contrary, but the Cirrus’s do have a tendancy to porpoise if you let the front wheel touch first. This is exactly what could happen in a fully developed porpoise also (having done that during training - don’t ask). We Cirrus drivers need to be cautious about speed management in the approach phase.

My experience in the 22 is it acts just like my Grumman Tiger. Tigers have same gear and the same exact behavior. It shows in the accident data btw (I will bet over time it shows up in Cirrus Accident data as well), but for different reasons. The Tiger has a long nose gear relative to the mains and is easy to bump first if you do not flare fairly hard. With the Cirrus, if you are on the numbers, when you flare you are running out of up elevator. Get much slower too far off the runway at zero power and bingo, you won’t be able to hold up the nose - porpoise will start and they happen in a split second.

I love my 22, but frankly think the SR needs a little more up elevator. Margin there is a little thin. I suspect that the new certification FAR’s, require that to minimize stall entry possiblities. Just something for the Pilot to be aware of and manage.

Roger
N706CD, SR22

Roger, You may need an ajustment to your elevator control linkage. I have not even come close to running out of elevator. What speed are you at flair?

Denis

CAUTION WAKE TURBULENCE!!! NEVER underestimate the vortex of a large aircraft! It can kill you. I always go around after a big jet lands rather than land behind one. I also approach 100’-200’ above the normal glidescope after any heavy aircraft has landed, and I make sure I touch down 200’-300’ further down the runway. Same thing on takeoff. Tell the tower you want to wait an extra min or two. They can not make you take off. ALWAYS lift off before the point the big boy lifted off and move you climb toward the windward side of his track.

Hope those people are OK.

Denis

What is the site address, please?

Hope everyone is indeed okay.

Dean

http://www.faa.gov/avr/aai/A_0618_N.TXT FAA Accident Site.

I hope they all walked away…

Here’s the report:

**** 6/18/01 Preliminary Accident/Incident Data Record 30 ****

A. Type: A Mid Air: N Missing: N Entry date: 6/18/01
From: SOUTHERN REGION OPERATIONS CENTER

B. Reg. No.: 739BB M/M: SR22 Desc: CIRRUS SR22

Activity: Pleasure Phase: Landing GA-A/C: General Aviation

Descr: AIRCRAFT ON FINAL TO RWY 20, CLRD TO LAND NUMBER TWO, FOLLOW SF14
ON A WIDE RIGHT BASE, CAUTION WAKE TURBULENCE, TOUCHED DOWN APPROX
1000-1500 FROM APCH END NEAR TWY B, BOUNCED A FEW TIMES, VEERED TO
LEFT CROSSING SOD AREA, TAXIWAY, ANOTHER SOD AREA AND IMPACTING A
PARKED DISABLED AIRCRAFT, SPRINGFIELD, MO

WX: 1854Z VRB06KT 10SM CLR 30/14 A3022

Damage: Destroyed

C2. Injury Data: # Crew: 2 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk: Y

Pass: 2 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk: Y

Grnd: Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk:

D. Location. City: SPRINGFIELD State: MO Country: US

E. Event Date: 6/16/01 Time: 1938

F. Invest Coverage. IIC: Reg/DO: SO15 DO City: ORLANDO

DO State: FL Others:
G. Flt Handling. Dep Pt: CHARITON, IA Dep Date: 6/16/01 Time: 1816

Dest: SPRINGFIELD, MO Last Radio Cont: 1930/12 MILE FINAL Flt Plan: UNK

Last Clearance: CLRD TO LAND WX Briefing: U

Other:

  • Mike.

BTW, I should be more clear. I have never run out of elevator authority in the landing phase. But if you try to hold the front wheel off the ground after the mains are on, you cannot do it very long. Almost immediately after touchdown you are at full up elevator. This is exactly what the Cirrus Test Pilot who did my acceptance ride did. He commented on it being full aft stick, so I do not think I have a style problem or too low a airspeed.

It just leads me to believe that this plane has a little less authority than others, or at least than I personally would like. Of course it is only at forward CG’s (I rarely fly with anyone in the back seats), which is excerbating it. Not the best aiplane to “stall it on”. This may be common with high HP, therefore heavier nosed AC as I hear of others that tend to do this as well.

My caution for others is if you get too slow or gusting winds cause a sudden drop in airspeed, you do not have a lot of margin in the elevator, particularly at forward CG’s. That is a receipe for porpoises, which some in this forum have commented on. Of course landing too fast also causes porpoising, which is probably the typical cause. The speed envelope is narrow, speed control is key…Lets all be safe!

Roger

N706CD

Awful, glad they are OK. WT is not the only way to do this. Not to be contrary, but the Cirrus’s do have a tendancy to porpoise if you let the front wheel touch first. This is exactly what could happen in a fully developed porpoise also (having done that during training - don’t ask). We Cirrus drivers need to be cautious about speed management in the approach phase.

My experience in the 22 is it acts just like my Grumman Tiger. Tigers have same gear and the same exact behavior. It shows in the accident data btw (I will bet over time it shows up in Cirrus Accident data as well), but for different reasons. The Tiger has a long nose gear relative to the mains and is easy to bump first if you do not flare fairly hard. With the Cirrus, if you are on the numbers, when you flare you are running out of up elevator. Get much slower too far off the runway at zero power and bingo, you won’t be able to hold up the nose - porpoise will start and they happen in a split second.

I love my 22, but frankly think the SR needs a little more up elevator. Margin there is a little thin. I suspect that the new certification FAR’s, require that to minimize stall entry possiblities. Just something for the Pilot to be aware of and manage.

Roger
N706CD, SR22

CAUTION WAKE TURBULENCE!!! NEVER underestimate the vortex of a large aircraft! It can kill you. I always go around after a big jet lands rather than land behind one. I also approach 100’-200’ above the normal glidescope after any heavy aircraft has landed, and I make sure I touch down 200’-300’ further down the runway. Same thing on takeoff. Tell the tower you want to wait an extra min or two. They can not make you take off. ALWAYS lift off before the point the big boy lifted off and move you climb toward the windward side of his track.

Hope those people are OK.

Denis

What is the site address, please?

Hope everyone is indeed okay.

Dean

http://www.faa.gov/avr/aai/A_0618_N.TXT FAA Accident Site.

I hope they all walked away…

Here’s the report:

**** 6/18/01 Preliminary Accident/Incident Data Record 30 ****

A. Type: A Mid Air: N Missing: N Entry date: 6/18/01
From: SOUTHERN REGION OPERATIONS CENTER

B. Reg. No.: 739BB M/M: SR22 Desc: CIRRUS SR22

Activity: Pleasure Phase: Landing GA-A/C: General Aviation

Descr: AIRCRAFT ON FINAL TO RWY 20, CLRD TO LAND NUMBER TWO, FOLLOW SF14
ON A WIDE RIGHT BASE, CAUTION WAKE TURBULENCE, TOUCHED DOWN APPROX
1000-1500 FROM APCH END NEAR TWY B, BOUNCED A FEW TIMES, VEERED TO
LEFT CROSSING SOD AREA, TAXIWAY, ANOTHER SOD AREA AND IMPACTING A
PARKED DISABLED AIRCRAFT, SPRINGFIELD, MO

WX: 1854Z VRB06KT 10SM CLR 30/14 A3022

Damage: Destroyed

C2. Injury Data: # Crew: 2 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk: Y

Pass: 2 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk: Y

Grnd: Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk:

D. Location. City: SPRINGFIELD State: MO Country: US

E. Event Date: 6/16/01 Time: 1938

F. Invest Coverage. IIC: Reg/DO: SO15 DO City: ORLANDO

DO State: FL Others:
G. Flt Handling. Dep Pt: CHARITON, IA Dep Date: 6/16/01 Time: 1816

Dest: SPRINGFIELD, MO Last Radio Cont: 1930/12 MILE FINAL Flt Plan: UNK

Last Clearance: CLRD TO LAND WX Briefing: U

Other:

  • Mike.

But if you try to hold the front wheel off the ground after the mains are on, you cannot do it very long.

But why would you want to? Once the mains are firmly planted, there is no good reason to hold the nosewheel off. While you may have been encouraged in primary training to hold the nose up, especially in something like a C150 where you can do it almost indefinitely, this is really just to teach you not to wheelbarrow it on.

Not the best airplane to “stall it on”

Agreed - this plane needs to be flown on to the ground.

My caution for others is if you get too slow or gusting winds cause a sudden drop in airspeed, you do not have a lot of margin in the elevator

If you get too slow, or bounce, then you need to add power, not up-elevator. The extra airflow over the elevator will help its response, but pulling back is never a cure for low airspeed!

I’ve never felt the need for more up-elevator in the SR20. After planting the mains, I lower the nose right away, then if necessary apply brakes and pull back to full up-elevator at the same time. This shifts weight onto the mains and off the nosewheel, but does not lift the nose. You can stop with a very short ground-roll this way. If you don’t need lots of braking, then just keep the nose light until slowed down.

Clyde,

Mostly agree. But, I do have 2 reasons. First I flew a plane for a long time that was known for having a kind of a weak designed nose gear and you were well advised to stall it on and hold the nose off. So some of what I am feeling is clearly just transitioning to a different plane. Second, keeping the high angle of attack bleeds off speed without using the brakes. That plane had gear just like the SR and was hard on brakes. That greatly extended brake life and I’ll bet at the SR’s higher weight it would help there as well. Since I fly almost exclusively on long paved strips, it made sense. I now have a tad over 25 hours in it and have not bounced it nor had a problem and I like it - alot. I would like to have the option of doing it at pilot descretion, but that is just my opinion. Of course you are right, the go switch is the absolute best way to deal with low airspeed. Thanks for the suggestions and perspective.

Roger

But if you try to hold the front wheel off the ground after the mains are on, you cannot do it very long.

But why would you want to? Once the mains are firmly planted, there is no good reason to hold the nosewheel off. While you may have been encouraged in primary training to hold the nose up, especially in something like a C150 where you can do it almost indefinitely, this is really just to teach you not to wheelbarrow it on.

Not the best airplane to “stall it on”

Agreed - this plane needs to be flown on to the ground.

My caution for others is if you get too slow or gusting winds cause a sudden drop in airspeed, you do not have a lot of margin in the elevator

If you get too slow, or bounce, then you need to add power, not up-elevator. The extra airflow over the elevator will help its response, but pulling back is never a cure for low airspeed!

I’ve never felt the need for more up-elevator in the SR20. After planting the mains, I lower the nose right away, then if necessary apply brakes and pull back to full up-elevator at the same time. This shifts weight onto the mains and off the nosewheel, but does not lift the nose. You can stop with a very short ground-roll this way. If you don’t need lots of braking, then just keep the nose light until slowed down.

CLRD TO LAND NUMBER TWO, FOLLOW SF14

What’s an SF14?

  • Mike.

Mike,

My guess is that this is a typo, and that the airplane in question was actually an “SF34” (a http://www.aircraft.saab.se/proinf/s340.htmSaab-Fairchild 340 twin-engine turboprop). But if course I could be wrong.

For what it’s worth, all the FAA-approved contractions are available on-line at http://www.faa.gov/ATpubs/CNT/CNTHME.HTMhttp://www.faa.gov/ATpubs/CNT/CNTHME.HTM.

— Roger

For those who have flown both: Does the SR22 landing technique differ in any material respect from the SR20?

The 22 lands almost identically to the 20, save for the need for a bit of down trim after deploying the final flaps (or it’ll get too slow.) You also have to come down the chute at 80 KIAS instead of 75. It also sits just a wee bit higher, which affects the sight picture if you’re greasing your landings. (If your landings are “close enough” as mine seem to be most of the time, the couple of inches seem to be lost in the noise.)

I don’t have any difficulty going back and forth between them.

The 22 lands almost identically to the 20, save for the need for a bit of down trim after deploying the final flaps (or it’ll get too slow.)(Plane don’t get slow you do) You also have to come down the chute(You heard that from an old timer) at 80 KIAS instead of 75.(Your not the POH) It also sits just a wee(My son does wee) bit higher, which affects the sight(?..If 1 or 2 inches makes a difference to you than god help us all) picture if you’re greasing your landings.(You don’t grease an SR- You arrive.)Don’t Flare pal or you will end up like that lady did in her new -22) (If your landings are “close enough”(God help us again) as mine seem to be most of the time,(My wife gets close enough to parked cars…what’s your point?) the couple of inches seem to be lost in the noise.)

I don’t have any difficulty going back and forth between them.

This is why I am scared to make these hp a/c like this.Are you really a buyer and owner sir?