New Avionics

Does anyone know what the diff. in features and cost is on the xpdr 320 vs the 327, and on the STEC 20(upgraded with alt hold) vs the 40 w/alt hold? Thanks in advance for any help.

The Garmin site has no price specifics but makes the 320/327 contrast clear. The 320 looks like a “normal” transponder, with four dials you turn to set the squawk. I gather it’s better than normal old xpdrs becuase of solid-state circuitry.

The 327 appears to have digital squawk entry – hit a key pad rather turn dials – and a dedicated VFR button to enter 1200 with one touch, plus a variety of timers and other functions. Check it out at www.garmin.com/gtx327.html and www.garmin.com/gtx320.html

The Garmin site has no price specifics but makes the 320/327 contrast clear. The 320 looks like a “normal” transponder, with four dials you turn to set the squawk. I gather it’s better than normal old xpdrs becuase of solid-state circuitry.

The 327 appears to have digital squawk entry – hit a key pad rather turn dials – and a dedicated VFR button to enter 1200 with one touch, plus a variety of timers and other functions. Check it out at www.garmin.com/gtx327.html and www.garmin.com/gtx320.html

Lafayette Avionics website (http://www.avionics-laf.com/) has the following prices listed for the two units:

GARMIN GTX 320 LIST 1,615.00, SALE 1,245.00

GARMIN GTX 327 LIST 1,895.00, SALE 1,527.00

I gather from their site that they sell at the “SALE” price.

While the solid state is nice and the ability to enter squawk codes is handy, the biggest benefit is that it has a flight timer. The stupid Davtron clock/OAT is not that great in timing department and I for one would have been pleased to have an independent flight timer.

The Garmin site has no price specifics but makes the 320/327 contrast clear. The 320 looks like a “normal” transponder, with four dials you turn to set the squawk. I gather it’s better than normal old xpdrs becuase of solid-state circuitry.

The 327 appears to have digital squawk entry – hit a key pad rather turn dials – and a dedicated VFR button to enter 1200 with one touch, plus a variety of timers and other functions. Check it out at www.garmin.com/gtx327.html and www.garmin.com/gtx320.html

Lafayette Avionics website (http://www.avionics-laf.com/) has the following prices listed for the two units:

GARMIN GTX 320 LIST 1,615.00, SALE 1,245.00

GARMIN GTX 327 LIST 1,895.00, SALE 1,527.00

I gather from their site that they sell at the “SALE” price.

Therefore, the S-tec 40x and the 327 add $1,280. in list-price value.

The Garmin site has no price specifics but makes the 320/327 contrast clear. The 320 looks like a “normal” transponder, with four dials you turn to set the squawk. I gather it’s better than normal old xpdrs becuase of solid-state circuitry.

The 327 appears to have digital squawk entry – hit a key pad rather turn dials – and a dedicated VFR button to enter 1200 with one touch, plus a variety of timers and other functions. Check it out at www.garmin.com/gtx327.html and www.garmin.com/gtx320.html

Lafayette Avionics website (http://www.avionics-laf.com/) has the following prices listed for the two units:

GARMIN GTX 320 LIST 1,615.00, SALE 1,245.00

GARMIN GTX 327 LIST 1,895.00, SALE 1,527.00

I gather from their site that they sell at the “SALE” price.

Therefore, the S-tec 40x and the 327 add $1,280. in list-price value. …which makes the actual price increase of the SR20, 7620.00 USD., and to upgrade the pre-latest increase positions should cost no more than 1280.00 (installation being the same)

While the solid state is nice

Note that the 320 is also solid state (I imagine they both have the same transmitter). So the only difference is the display, entry method, and the timers.

Unfortunately, having the 327 would not allow getting rid of the existing clock, since it is also the OAT.