Houston . . We've got a problem.

I normally don’t play the part of a “futurist” but having lived through Hurricane Andrew, it’s insurance claims, litigation, divorces, etc. I have a regretful prediction. They say that Hurricane Andrew was the most expensive storm to hit the U.S. Andrew hit very southern Florida, south of Miami . . . Homestead Florida to be exact.
As of this moment, Hurricane Charlie is still well into the gulf and already clocking winds of 145 MPH. It is approaching the high density communities of Ft Myers, Naples, St. Petersburg & Tampa. It will go straight up central Florida, Orlando, Disneyworld, through Daytona, and continue up the east coast. (Boy, watch Tinkerbell fly now)
We are talking big bucks here.
If you have a plane, car, generator or a strong back, our friends will need your help.
Whether you are an Angel Flight Pilot or a person with a pick up truck, please let the people who need help know if you are available.
Like I said, I have been through Andrew. To this day, it has left scars. Both physical, and emotional.
I can’t tell you strongly enough how much we appreciated getting canned food, water, and just a smile from someone willing to help. Be prepared. I believe this one will need all of our help. Speaking strictly for me, I will be available.

Dennis –

See it live
http://waterbc.wm.llnwd.net/waterbc_netvideo

I’m available too.

I have access to both a Previa van and an F150 long-bed.

Haven’t heard anything from Angel Flight, so I’ll be free for the next couple of days.

4 P.M Charlie comes on shore at Punta Gorda

In reply to:


I’m available too.
I have access to both a Previa van and an F150 long-bed.
Haven’t heard anything from Angel Flight, so I’ll be free for the next couple of days.


Don’t forget the motorcycle Ed. I’m not kidding. Often the roads are blocked. After Andrew, my car couldn’t get out of the driveway, but my 750 Triumph was the only way to get around. Also, gas was in short supply. I mean there was gas, but it couldn’t be pumped because there was no electric.
I just got a letter from Angel Flight. They have shut down as they are in the path of the storm, and have asked for a “standby” status from all of their 1st response pilots.

In reply to:


Don’t forget the motorcycle Ed.


I actually used my BMW GS to deliver supplies to a friend in S Miami after Andrew.

It wasn’t a bad way to get around right after Irene came from nowhere and drenched us:
1-100475-MVC-001S.JPG

Looking at that great radar image of Charlie inspires a few questions. First…NO…I’m not planning on doing any hurricane flying!..but I am curious just how survivable flying in a Hurricane like Charlie would be. I noticed on both Charlie and Bonnie radar images there was actually very little red returns, mostly orange and dark orange. It also seemed, except toward the eye of the storm, that winds were mostly well under 100 mph.

So, for the meteriologists out there (Scott???), how does a fully developed Hurricane compare to the average summer boomer in the South? Is there severe turbulence, as in a TS, or just mostly high wind?

In reply to:


I am curious just how survivable flying in a Hurricane like Charlie would be


NOT

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Just like some thunderstorms, hurricanes can have tornadoes associated with them. Last I heard these were rough on GA airplanes.

Note that the planes flown into hurricanes are piston engine based and have four engines. I seem to remember that engine failure due to extreme amounts of water ingestion is a concern. I heard one lost several engines and had to land at Keesler after flying through Camile. Of course there were lots of stories going around after that storm.

An academy classmate of mine flew Connie’s into hurricanes when the Navy was still in that business in the 70’s. According to him, at least for big airplanes, a hurricane, because of its relative predictability as to wind speed and direction, is much less a threat than your average thunderstorm.

While I’ve never flown into a hurricane, NOAA has been doing it for years, first with C121s (Connies) and now with modified P-3s (Electras). I don’t remember any aircraft being lost.
Thunderstorms on the other hand seem to be much harder on airplanes - especially if there is hail.
Either way, neither is a suitable place for any GA aircraft.

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1-101125-HurricaneAlex-2.gif

In reply to:


Jerry,
You should try it sometime…I did.


I have read and considered your collective answers as to flying in a hurricane, and I stand my position.

              **NOT**

Scott,
I HAVE flown through a thunderstorm. Have to admit it makes me a little gun shy.
Nice to have your posts again.