Engine temps / flight at MTOW

Are people running into or near the red on climbs? I have heard of this happening on at least one plane out here on the west coast, and I’m curious as to how the plane is holding up in higher temp. areas of the country. On a related note – I haven’t read too many reports on how the plane flies at or near MTOW.

I haven’t read too many reports on how the plane flies at or near MTOW.

I spoke to Rob Leach not long ago, and he had some comments about the handling of the plane at the ferry weight (not sure what it was exactly, but it would be somewhere around 3600 lbs).

Rob said that even at full aft CG, the plane was very stable in pitch, unlike e.g. an Archer, which when ferry-tanked, deviates from pitch quite readily in light turbulence. He felt that the CG range is very conservative.

Climb rate at this weight was not great, and by about 6000’ it was struggling somewhat, but the takeoff roll was not particularly long (this was at sea level, of course).

Clyde,

what does “not great” mean? Is this still more than 500ft/min or less? What means struggling at 6000 ft. Was this the max. altitude he could climb to?

Thanx for explaining

Placido

I haven’t read too many reports on how the plane flies at or near MTOW.

I spoke to Rob Leach not long ago, and he had some comments about the handling of the plane at the ferry weight (not sure what it was exactly, but it would be somewhere around 3600 lbs).

Rob said that even at full aft CG, the plane was very stable in pitch, unlike e.g. an Archer, which when ferry-tanked, deviates from pitch quite readily in light turbulence. He felt that the CG range is very conservative.

Climb rate at this weight was not great, and by about 6000’ it was struggling somewhat, but the takeoff roll was not particularly long (this was at sea level, of course).

I haven’t read too many reports on how the plane flies at or near MTOW.

I spoke to Rob Leach not long ago, and he had some comments about the handling of the plane at the ferry weight (not sure what it was exactly, but it would be somewhere around 3600 lbs).

Last time I checked the POH the max weight was 2900 lbs?? Can the SR20 jettison fuel in case of a need to return to the dep airport (like with engine trouble…)

Just curious

Han K

Rob said that even at full aft CG, the plane was very stable in pitch, unlike e.g. an Archer, which when ferry-tanked, deviates from pitch quite readily in light turbulence. He felt that the CG range is very conservative.

Climb rate at this weight was not great, and by about 6000’ it was struggling somewhat, but the takeoff roll was not particularly long (this was at sea level, of course).

Clyde,

what does “not great” mean? Is this still more than 500ft/min or less? What means struggling at 6000 ft. Was this the max. altitude he could climb to?

I don’t have any more details, but I will ask when I call Rob tomorrow in Pago Pago.

Last time I checked the POH the max weight was 2900 lbs?? Can the SR20 jettison fuel in case of a need to return to the dep airport

No, there’s no provision for dumping fuel. The 3600 lbs is under the 25% overweight approval for the ferry flight. There is something like 210 gallons of fuel on board, most of it in three tanks inside the cabin (two where the rear seats were, one where the co-pilot’s seat was).

I haven’t seen the details of the overweight approval, but it required Cirrus Design to do some calculations for stall speed, maneuvering speed etc. at the increased weight.

I would imagine if you needed to land at that weight you would be careful about the touchdown, but AFAIK the same landing gear etc. is to be used on the SR22, which will have a max gross weight of around the same figure.

An increase in the gross weight of 25% above the certificated limit is common for ferry operations.