Golf Clubs in an SR 22

I’m considering an 2004 SR 22 for purchase and I have a question. Can you fit 4 sets of golf clubs in the baggage area of an SR22 if I take them out of the golf bags?

No problem. I take my driver out and stand my bags up in back. Getting 4 golfers in the airplane is the problem.

I’ll fly a buddy from KORL to Pinehurst with clubs and a duffel bag. For more, I’d ship the clubs. A few services exist to handle this. And it has to be cheaper than getting into a Bonanza.

I looked at the W&B. I can fit four guys in the aircraft, with clubs but only take 30 gals of fuel. That’s about 150 miles.

I fly to golf destinations a lot, but prefer 3 total in plane. Although at the tabs my Cirrus can carry 857 lbs.(empty weight 2267). I put one of the back seats down and stack the 3 sets of clubs on top of seat. Works great and you do not have to pull the long clubs out.

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I looked at the W&B. I can fit four guys in the aircraft, with clubs but only take 30 gals of fuel. That’s about 150 miles.


I don’t like to land with less than 20 gallons so that would be a very short trip in my Turbo burning 35gph on climbout!

when I get to 30 gallons I am landing. And never in the air with less than 20. I suppose if your flying in the mid west were there are lots of airports in close prox. you can mitigate that. Were we fly in the PAC nor west nevada CA. to many rocks and airports are to far apart to launch with minimum fuel.

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I fly to golf destinations a lot, but prefer 3 total in plane. Although at the tabs my Cirrus can carry 857 lbs.(empty weight 2267). I put one of the back seats down and stack the 3 sets of clubs on top of seat. Works great and you do not have to pull the long clubs out.


I f your primary mission is 4 adults, 4 sets of clubs than the Cirrus might not be the best choice. But, if you want a great plane that is safe, modern and comes with a parachute then the SR22 is the ticket. You can also save $$$$$ on a pre-owned. The market is flooded with all the versions coming out every six months-

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I don’t like to land with less than 20 gallons so that would be a very short trip in my Turbo burning 35gph on climbout!


I’m with you. I don’t like it when the lights come on and they come on with only 10 gallons a side (20 total).

I guess the Cirrus won’t do what I want it to do. Considering a turbo normalized Bonanza to get the weight/speed that I need.

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I guess the Cirrus won’t do what I want it to do. Considering a turbo normalized Bonanza to get the weight/speed that I need.


Other than the lack of CAPS the Bonanza is the best airplane out there IMHO. Cirrus’ big problem is lack of payload. The planes are way too heavy and restricted to only 3,400#. My TN22 with air conditioning, full of fuel, will only give me 2 men (190# each) and 30# of luggage - that’s it. If I drop the fuel to 60 gallons I can get a small guy in the back - still no luggage.

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I guess the Cirrus won’t do what I want it to do. Considering a turbo normalized Bonanza to get the weight/speed that I need.


Take a look at the Piper Matrix

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Other than the lack of CAPS the Bonanza is the best airplane out there IMHO. Cirrus’ big problem is lack of payload. The planes are way too heavy and restricted to only 3,400#. My TN22 with air conditioning, full of fuel, will only give me 2 men (190# each) and 30# of luggage - that’s it. If I drop the fuel to 60 gallons I can get a small guy in the back - still no luggage.


According to the company’s website, the G36 has a max gross of 3650. It has a typical empty weight of 2600 lbs. That leaves a useful load of 1050 lbs. This is on a plane with A/C and a hot prop but no TKS and no turbo. BTW it will only carry 74 gallons of fuel. An SR22 loaded except no TKS or turbo but with composite prop and standard paint comes in around 1089 for useful load. Dropping things like Skywatch, Stormscope and XM would lower this. The SR22 has the option of going to 92 gallons so it will have a longer range. The G36 wins on interior room but not on load carrying ability.

Paul

Does anyone take one/both of the back seats out for space/weight? Taking camping gear to OSH and thought that might be solution to space constraints. Might get by just lowering seat back, but wonder about weight savings w/ removal.

Regards,

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Does anyone take one/both of the back seats out for space/weight? Taking camping gear to OSH and thought that might be solution to space constraints. Might get by just lowering seat back, but wonder about weight savings w/ removal.
Regards,


I did this over the weekend so we could take our 26" folding bikes.

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Does anyone take one/both of the back seats out for space/weight? Taking camping gear to OSH and thought that might be solution to space constraints. Might get by just lowering seat back, but wonder about weight savings w/ removal.
Regards,


Randy - my understanding is that the SR22 is not considered airworthy without the back seats. There was a thread on this a couple years ago.

Dan,

Here’s a quote from a thread in 2004 on this topic:

“A good place to look for information pertaining to what has to be in the aircraft all the time, is in the equipment list located in the weight and balance section of the POH. Next to each item there will be a corresponding letter, which states whether the equipment is required by FAA, required for the Airworthiness Certificate to be valid, or is optional equipment, and so forth. I would highly recommend that before anyone attempts to modify their aircraft they look in this section carefully.”

In the past, the rear sears had a code of “C” which as I recall meant that the aircraft was not airworthy without rear seats regardless of an updated W&B.

My W&B hasn’t changed in 5 years, so I’m not sure what mine says, but I encourage you to check yours.

It may be silly, but it also may be da rules.

Tom

I agree with that. I flew a G36 Bonanza and like the SR22 better unless you needed to haul a load and did not need to go far.

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According to the company’s website, the G36 has a max gross of 3650. It has a typical empty weight of 2600 lbs. That leaves a useful load of 1050 lbs. This is on a plane with A/C and a hot prop but no TKS and no turbo. BTW it will only carry 74 gallons of fuel. An SR22 loaded except no TKS or turbo but with composite prop and standard paint comes in around 1089 for useful load. Dropping things like Skywatch, Stormscope and XM would lower this. The SR22 has the option of going to 92 gallons so it will have a longer range. The G36 wins on interior room but not on load carrying ability.
Paul


If you turbo normalize a Bonanza, you get a 300 lb. gross weight increase. 50 lbs goes to the turbo normalizer, leaving 250 lbs. additional usefull load. The TN Bonanza has a usefull load of 1,400 lbs. Taking out 400 lbs for fuel leaves 1,000 lbs for passengers and golf clubs. That’s plenty.

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If you turbo normalize a Bonanza, you get a 300 lb. gross weight increase. 50 lbs goes to the turbo normalizer, leaving 250 lbs. additional usefull load. The TN Bonanza has a usefull load of 1,400 lbs. Taking out 400 lbs for fuel leaves 1,000 lbs for passengers and golf clubs. That’s plenty.


Good point Jeff.