SR22 insurance

As a soon to be SR22 owner I am searching for the best rates on insurance. I am a low time (<110 hour) private pilot (working on my insturment rating)and have had quotes ranging from $7,500 to $10,000 per annum. Does anyone know of an insurance company that is a bit more Cirrus (and low time) friendly?

Thanks,

Charles

PS: Thank you to all the members of this forum. I really appreciate the diverse information and ‘Cirrus PIREPS’.

As a soon to be SR22 owner I am searching for the best rates on insurance. I am a low time (<110 hour) private pilot (working on my insturment rating)and have had quotes ranging from $7,500 to $10,000 per annum. Does anyone know of an insurance company that is a bit more Cirrus (and low time) friendly?

Thanks,

Charles

PS: Thank you to all the members of this forum. I really appreciate the diverse information and ‘Cirrus PIREPS’.

Charles,

I have a quote from AOPA Insurance for 4188.00. Coverage 1 million dollars per incident with 310 thousand hull. Zero deductable in motion or not in motion. The underwriter is USAIG. However I have a little more time with a CFII. I’m told because there is no history experience with the SR22, rates will be higher the first year. I also would like to here from other owner/position holders. Are you finding anything better?

As a soon to be SR22 owner I am searching for the best rates on insurance. I am a low time (<110 hour) private pilot (working on my insturment rating)and have had quotes ranging from $7,500 to $10,000 per annum. Does anyone know of an insurance company that is a bit more Cirrus (and low time) friendly?

Thanks,

Charles

PS: Thank you to all the members of this forum. I really appreciate the diverse information and ‘Cirrus PIREPS’.

I just bound insurance on my SR22 being picked up Monday June 11th, there is only a couple companies writing the SR22 at this time. I’m using US Specialties through a broker but AOPA does use them too. I have 210 hours logged private SEL working on instrument. They are requiring 8 hours flight time and groundschool with Wings Aloft and 3 hours with my CFI who is coming along and getting checked out, they are requiring him to get 5 hours. Then I can fly without restrictions after 11 hours, pretty resonable! The cost!!! Yes $7,221 for 1 million and $100,000 per person, $5,000 deductible. The agent feels after some time has passed and no problems the rates should come down. Also if more companies start writing the 22, competition will help. Of course 300 hours with an intrument rating will help too, but remember the hull value dictates much of the cost. Rick Kummerow SR22 #36 position for N122KM

At these rates, you might think about self-insuring the hull portion (or a part of it) at least until you get some additional time. There’s no requirement that you have hull insurance unless you’re financing. Seems like you could put $7K - $10K to another use without too much trouble. On the other hand, if you have $300K in cash floating around to pay cash for an airplane, you probably wouldn’t care about the premiums.

As a soon to be SR22 owner I am searching for the best rates on insurance. I am a low time (<110 hour) private pilot (working on my insturment rating)and have had quotes ranging from $7,500 to $10,000 per annum. Does anyone know of an insurance company that is a bit more Cirrus (and low time) friendly?

Thanks,

Charles

PS: Thank you to all the members of this forum. I really appreciate the diverse information and ‘Cirrus PIREPS’.

Rick, I will be in Duluth next Tuesday (the 12th) picking up my '22 (#38) - see you there! By the way, I just secured insurance today through Sentry Insurance Co. I a low time pilot with 210 hours and a recent instrument rating. The coverage is limited to $1mm total occurance, $100k per passenger and $302k on the hull. I have a $500 deductible in the hangar and $1,000 all other. Sentry requires Wings Aloft training and 10 hours of solo flight before carrying passangers. Total cost is $4,880. This same company gave me a quote prior to my instrument rating, which I obtained last week, which was $5,380. So I only got a 10% reduction for the instrument rating, which doesn’t seem right. My agent says I can expect a 30% reduction in the IFR rate with 500 hours and 100+ in type.

Insurance and all, I just can’t wait to pick up this bird!!

Dan

As a soon to be SR22 owner I am searching for the best rates on insurance. I am a low time (<110 hour) private pilot (working on my insturment rating)and have had quotes ranging from $7,500 to $10,000 per annum. Does anyone know of an insurance company that is a bit more Cirrus (and low time) friendly?

Thanks,

Charles

PS: Thank you to all the members of this forum. I really appreciate the diverse information and ‘Cirrus PIREPS’.

Charles,

I have a quote from AOPA Insurance for 4188.00. Coverage 1 million dollars per incident with 310 thousand hull. Zero deductable in motion or not in motion. The underwriter is USAIG. However I have a little more time with a CFII. I’m told because there is no history experience with the SR22, rates will be higher the first year. I also would like to here from other owner/position holders. Are you finding anything better?

Rick, I will be in Duluth next Tuesday (the 12th) picking up my '22 (#38) - see you there! By the way, I just secured insurance today through Sentry Insurance Co. I a low time pilot with 210 hours and a recent instrument rating. The coverage is limited to $1mm total occurance, $100k per passenger and $302k on the hull. I have a $500 deductible in the hangar and $1,000 all other. Sentry requires Wings Aloft training and 10 hours of solo flight before carrying passangers. Total cost is $4,880. This same company gave me a quote prior to my instrument rating, which I obtained last week, which was $5,380. So I only got a 10% reduction for the instrument rating, which doesn’t seem right. My agent says I can expect a 30% reduction in the IFR rate with 500 hours and 100+ in type.

Insurance and all, I just can’t wait to pick up this bird!!

Dan

Looks like Rick, you and I will be cutting holes through the sky together. Congratulations on your new ticket!!!

#37 N6CD

Bob

As a soon to be SR22 owner I am searching for the best rates on insurance. I am a low time (<110 hour) private pilot (working on my insturment rating)and have had quotes ranging from $7,500 to $10,000 per annum. Does anyone know of an insurance company that is a bit more Cirrus (and low time) friendly?

Thanks,

Charles

PS: Thank you to all the members of this forum. I really appreciate the diverse information and ‘Cirrus PIREPS’.

Charles,

I have a quote from AOPA Insurance for 4188.00. Coverage 1 million dollars per incident with 310 thousand hull. Zero deductable in motion or not in motion. The underwriter is USAIG. However I have a little more time with a CFII. I’m told because there is no history experience with the SR22, rates will be higher the first year. I also would like to here from other owner/position holders. Are you finding anything better?

FWIW, $1 million with $100,000 per person is very limited coverage. For all practical purposes, in the event of an accident, your going bare. $1 million “smooth” is considered by many to be a minimum level of acceptable coverage; many carry more.>

Rick, I will be in Duluth next Tuesday (the 12th) picking up my '22 (#38) - see you there! By the way, I just secured insurance today through Sentry Insurance Co. I a low time pilot with 210 hours and a recent instrument rating. The coverage is limited to $1mm total occurance, $100k per passenger and $302k on the hull. I have a $500 deductible in the hangar and $1,000 all other. Sentry requires Wings Aloft training and 10 hours of solo flight before carrying passangers. Total cost is $4,880. This same company gave me a quote prior to my instrument rating, which I obtained last week, which was $5,380. So I only got a 10% reduction for the instrument rating, which doesn’t seem right. My agent says I can expect a 30% reduction in the IFR rate with 500 hours and 100+ in type.

Insurance and all, I just can’t wait to pick up this bird!!

Dan

As a soon to be SR22 owner I am searching for the best rates on insurance. I am a low time (<110 hour) private pilot (working on my insturment rating)and have had quotes ranging from $7,500 to $10,000 per annum. Does anyone know of an insurance company that is a bit more Cirrus (and low time) friendly?

Thanks,

Charles

PS: Thank you to all the members of this forum. I really appreciate the diverse information and ‘Cirrus PIREPS’.

Charles,

I have a quote from AOPA Insurance for 4188.00. Coverage 1 million dollars per incident with 310 thousand hull. Zero deductable in motion or not in motion. The underwriter is USAIG. However I have a little more time with a CFII. I’m told because there is no history experience with the SR22, rates will be higher the first year. I also would like to here from other owner/position holders. Are you finding anything better?

As a soon to be SR22 owner I am searching for the best rates on insurance. I am a low time (<110 hour) private pilot (working on my insturment rating)and have had quotes ranging from $7,500 to $10,000 per annum. Does anyone know of an insurance company that is a bit more Cirrus (and low time) friendly?

Thanks,

Charles

PS: Thank you to all the members of this forum. I really appreciate the diverse information and ‘Cirrus PIREPS’.

I just bound insurance on my SR22 being picked up Monday June 11th, there is only a couple companies writing the SR22 at this time. I’m using US Specialties through a broker but AOPA does use them too. I have 210 hours logged private SEL working on instrument. They are requiring 8 hours flight time and groundschool with Wings Aloft and 3 hours with my CFI who is coming along and getting checked out, they are requiring him to get 5 hours. Then I can fly without restrictions after 11 hours, pretty resonable! The cost!!! Yes $7,221 for 1 million and $100,000 per person, $5,000 deductible. The agent feels after some time has passed and no problems the rates should come down. Also if more companies start writing the 22, competition will help. Of course 300 hours with an intrument rating will help too, but remember the hull value dictates much of the cost. Rick Kummerow SR22 #36 position for N122KM

You might look forward to saving at least $3,000.00 with 170 more hours and an IFR rating with insurance from USAIG.

Look forward to meeting you. I, too, will be picking up an SR22, N6CD, on monday the 11th. See you soon!!

Bob

As a soon to be SR22 owner I am searching for the best rates on insurance. I am a low time (<110 hour) private pilot (working on my insturment rating)and have had quotes ranging from $7,500 to $10,000 per annum. Does anyone know of an insurance company that is a bit more Cirrus (and low time) friendly?

Thanks,

Charles

PS: Thank you to all the members of this forum. I really appreciate the diverse information and ‘Cirrus PIREPS’.

I just bound insurance on my SR22 being picked up Monday June 11th, there is only a couple companies writing the SR22 at this time. I’m using US Specialties through a broker but AOPA does use them too. I have 210 hours logged private SEL working on instrument. They are requiring 8 hours flight time and groundschool with Wings Aloft and 3 hours with my CFI who is coming along and getting checked out, they are requiring him to get 5 hours. Then I can fly without restrictions after 11 hours, pretty resonable! The cost!!! Yes $7,221 for 1 million and $100,000 per person, $5,000 deductible. The agent feels after some time has passed and no problems the rates should come down. Also if more companies start writing the 22, competition will help. Of course 300 hours with an intrument rating will help too, but remember the hull value dictates much of the cost. Rick Kummerow SR22 #36 position for N122KM

FOR WHAT ITS WORTH I FEEL THAT THE SR-22 IS TO MUCH FOR A LOW TIME PILOT TO TRANSISTION INTO 110 HRS IS DEFINETLY NOT ENOUGH TIME FOR THIS AIRPLANE I FEEL 400-500 MINIMUM FOR THIS TYPE OF PLANE THATS WHY INSURANCE IS SO HIGH FOR LOW TIME PILOTS IN THIS PLANE . i HOPE COMMON SENSE
PREVAILS OVER MONEY

Is the SR22 too much for low timers?
While h.p. makes it high performance
compared to the SR20, it flies and
operates the same. A lower powered
'152 or '172 is more challenging than
either SR in high and hot conditions.

Of more concern is an aircraft’s
systems complexity and handling, and
flying consistent with one’s skills.
Training, practice, and currency
count as well as hours.

AF pilot trainees solo in the
supersonic T-38 in the same hours as
one does in the '152, and with less
than 200 hours total. Granted, their
130 or less hours in the primary or
first trainer, Cessna’s T-37, come in

a highly structured six-month program.

Please. Please…

Let’s compare apples with apples.

How much does it cost to insure a $300K airplane with 310 HP if I only have 110 total time flight hours.

I don’t like to hear people complaining because it is too much money for the insurance. I agree it is too much BUT. I must compare apples with apples. My Lancair when faster, retractable with less HP and it only cost $1400 a year with 1M coverage. Here is the kicker, if it when up in flames I only received $80K, there is where the diference is… Microsoft gave me a choice, I did not have to buy their reasonable priced product… Insurance companies, do NOT give me a choice and I have to have what ever no matter how bad it is, and yes, it cost too much. Is the GOV doing anything about it… No. But the problem is not Cirrus so please, don’t blame it on my dream airplane. Blame it where the problem is, and say thanks to all the hard working people at Cirrus and the brains behind the whole thing, they are the ones that we need to thank for bringing this marvelous (don’t you like the way I speel… sorry)state of art airplane. I like to think of Cirrus just like Microsoft, a great company, I know some of you wont agree, but stop and think for a minute, do you really think we would be here having a good time using Clyde’s board if it wasn’t for MS? and Cirrus too? Sorry for getting carried away… What that heck, go have a great Cirrus weekend and don’t forget to send a thank you card to Cirrus…

Then, be happy…

:slight_smile:

Woor

As a soon to be SR22 owner I am searching for the best rates on insurance. I am a low time (<110 hour) private pilot (working on my insturment rating)and have had quotes ranging from $7,500 to $10,000 per annum. Does anyone know of an insurance company that is a bit more Cirrus (and low time) friendly?

Thanks,

Charles

PS: Thank you to all the members of this forum. I really appreciate the diverse information and ‘Cirrus PIREPS’.

I just bound insurance on my SR22 being picked up Monday June 11th, there is only a couple companies writing the SR22 at this time. I’m using US Specialties through a broker but AOPA does use them too. I have 210 hours logged private SEL working on instrument. They are requiring 8 hours flight time and groundschool with Wings Aloft and 3 hours with my CFI who is coming along and getting checked out, they are requiring him to get 5 hours. Then I can fly without restrictions after 11 hours, pretty resonable! The cost!!! Yes $7,221 for 1 million and $100,000 per person, $5,000 deductible. The agent feels after some time has passed and no problems the rates should come down. Also if more companies start writing the 22, competition will help. Of course 300 hours with an intrument rating will help too, but remember the hull value dictates much of the cost. Rick Kummerow SR22 #36 position for N122KM

FOR WHAT ITS WORTH I FEEL THAT THE SR-22 IS TO MUCH FOR A LOW TIME PILOT TO TRANSISTION INTO 110 HRS IS DEFINETLY NOT ENOUGH TIME FOR THIS AIRPLANE I FEEL 400-500 MINIMUM FOR THIS TYPE OF PLANE THATS WHY INSURANCE IS SO HIGH FOR LOW TIME PILOTS IN THIS PLANE . i HOPE COMMON SENSE
PREVAILS OVER MONEY

Ernie,

I totally disagree with you. Hell, I’m almost rude enough to shout: “You don’t know what you’re talking about.” but I won’t. :slight_smile:

The SR22 can be a complex aircraft if one allows one to become overawed with all of the video game features onboard, but it flies like a dream.

It is far more gentle and forgiving than any taildragger I have ever flown. The p-factor is minimal, it is stable at low speeds, damn near impossible to spin, and it penetrates turbulence well.

Frankly, I would expect fossils who have 10,000hrs in citbrias, cubs, and cessna 15x’s to be in much more trouble than a newly minted 110hr pilot with recent training.

For all the bells and whistles, it’s just a damn good airplane. Fly the plane, play with the toys when it’s not stressful.

As a soon to be SR22 owner I am searching for the best rates on insurance. I am a low time (<110 hour) private pilot (working on my insturment rating)and have had quotes ranging from $7,500 to $10,000 per annum. Does anyone know of an insurance company that is a bit more Cirrus (and low time) friendly?

Thanks,

Charles

PS: Thank you to all the members of this forum. I really appreciate the diverse information and ‘Cirrus PIREPS’.

I just bound insurance on my SR22 being picked up Monday June 11th, there is only a couple companies writing the SR22 at this time. I’m using US Specialties through a broker but AOPA does use them too. I have 210 hours logged private SEL working on instrument. They are requiring 8 hours flight time and groundschool with Wings Aloft and 3 hours with my CFI who is coming along and getting checked out, they are requiring him to get 5 hours. Then I can fly without restrictions after 11 hours, pretty resonable! The cost!!! Yes $7,221 for 1 million and $100,000 per person, $5,000 deductible. The agent feels after some time has passed and no problems the rates should come down. Also if more companies start writing the 22, competition will help. Of course 300 hours with an intrument rating will help too, but remember the hull value dictates much of the cost. Rick Kummerow SR22 #36 position for N122KM

FOR WHAT ITS WORTH I FEEL THAT THE SR-22 IS TO MUCH FOR A LOW TIME PILOT TO TRANSISTION INTO 110 HRS IS DEFINETLY NOT ENOUGH TIME FOR THIS AIRPLANE I FEEL 400-500 MINIMUM FOR THIS TYPE OF PLANE THATS WHY INSURANCE IS SO HIGH FOR LOW TIME PILOTS IN THIS PLANE . i HOPE COMMON SENSE
PREVAILS OVER MONEY

Sir,

I very much appreciate and share your sincere, if slightly AGGRESSIVE, concern for my and other low timers in this type of ac. Although all of my hours have been in new ac with ‘modern’ avionics in addition to high performance and complex time (Bonanza) flying out of a controlled airport in and around class B and D airspace, common sense, meticulous preparation and an uncompromising commitment to safety lead my transition to this ac. They have also led me to pay for my CFII’s, instruction in the SR22 as well as my own. He is a 22 year veteran, full time, instructor that has trained me from 0 hrs. An appropriate, safe and rational level of comfort and proficiency in this ac, whether it takes 2 or 200 additional hours, will be under my belt, and hopefully other low timers, before full transition. Much of my initial flight time will be with high time pilots on board. With regard to your general implication about low time pilots (and from reading this forum there are quite a few) with little common sense purchasing or considering purchase of this ac: not all of us are 21 year old fighter pilot wanna be’s trained in 150s stuffing money into the fuel tanks of this hp ac and hollering ‘watch this’. The very appeal of this ac to this and other low timers looking to transition to a hp ac is significant and telling. This ac provides a far less complex transition to high performance (although somewhat more complex to those without experience with avionics of this nature) than others of its class. Most low timers that have posted here seem to be ‘factory training’ their CFIs as well. I appreciate the quality and depth of this forum and continue to learn from the experience, time and CONCERN of its contributors. Although your post did seem to generate quite a bit of reaction, I do appreciate and share your concern and respect for the power and performance of the SR22 and am REALLY looking forward to my careful transition!!! :-))

Charles

PS: Thanks to everyone for their very helpful info on the insurance issue.

I like to think of Cirrus just like Microsoft, a great company,

Hi Woor,

I know we typically agree on a lot, but please don’t compare Cirrus to Microsoft! If my Cirrus “crashed” as often as my Microsoft products “crash”, I’d really be in a world of hurt. :slight_smile:

Steve

Hello Steve,

I don’t use the word cr sh any time I talk about airplanes. I never had one and don’t plan on one.

You do have to agree that MS has brought plenty of goodies to the table. I just can’t picture how we would be today if it was not for MS.

Have a great Cirrus RBS day…

PS, I will stop by tomorrow and check on … u no…

Cheers,

Woor

I like to think of Cirrus just like Microsoft, a great company,

Hi Woor,

I know we typically agree on a lot, but please don’t compare Cirrus to Microsoft! If my Cirrus “crashed” as often as my Microsoft products “crash”, I’d really be in a world of hurt. :slight_smile:

Steve

I just can’t picture how we would be today if it was not for MS.

…people wouldn’t use up dozens of hours every week while waiting for Win to reboot or reinstalling it again and again

…seems like they even can’t imagine any more how it could be with a computer working for one and not the other way round

…what would they do with the saved time not wasted on MS?

…how would the world be with people having more time for each other - or more time for flying :slight_smile:

Have great “any other OS” day!

Wilfried

P.S.: once a MS guy told me “we do not have the best product, but we have the best marketing”. I have to agree 100% with that. Most people don’t even know on anything else than MS and if they can’t think of using it. That is indeed the result of almost perfect marketing.

But now it’s starting to get off-topic…

Ernie,

I totally disagree with you. Hell, I’m almost rude enough to shout: “You don’t know what you’re talking about.” but I won’t. :slight_smile:

The SR22 can be a complex aircraft if one allows one to become overawed with all of the video game features onboard, but it flies like a dream.

It is far more gentle and forgiving than any taildragger I have ever flown. The p-factor is minimal, it is stable at low speeds, damn near impossible to spin, and it penetrates turbulence well.

Frankly, I would expect fossils who have 10,000hrs in citbrias, cubs, and cessna 15x’s to be in much more trouble than a newly minted 110hr pilot with recent training.

For all the bells and whistles, it’s just a damn good airplane. Fly the plane, play with the toys when it’s not stressful.

HEY PAUL EVERYONE TO THEIR OWN OPINION OK

MY STATEMENT IS SHARED BY ARTICLES IVE READ FROM HIGH TIME PILOTS THAT TEST FLEW THE SR20 A LOT SLOWER THAN THE 22 . IF INTERESTED ILL FAX YOU THESE. IVE FLOWN THE PLANE AND I AGREE WITH ALL STATEMENTS YOU MADE , BUT I STILL SAY SPEED MANAGEMENT AND JUDGEMENT CALLS YOU LEARN THROUGH EXPERIENCE ARE SOMETHING YOU NEED TO HAVE WHEN GOING TO A PLANE THAT HAS THE SR22 PERFORMANCE AND THE INSURANCE COMPANIES KNOW THIS THATS WHY TO THWM A 110 HR PILOT IN A HIGH PERFORMANCE SLICK AIRPLANE IS A HIGH RISK.OK

REGARDS ERNIE

I think you both make good points. I while back my CFII and I got checked out in a 170 knot Mooney to do some long xcountry flights. He had 3200 hours, mostly in a C172, and I had 200 hours all in a C172. We both reached a general comfort, and flight capability level in the Mooney after roughly the same number of hours in the plane. But it took me a few more hours/flights adjust to thinking further ahead on approach, due to the increased speed of the plane. I am very mindful of this as I prepare (and spend every hour of every day thinking about) picking up my SR22 next week.

Having flown both the '20 and '22 I find them much easier to fly than the Mooney, and would not agree that one should wait until they build 500 hours before jumping into a Cirrus. Would that mean all pilots should stick to 172’s until 500 hours before flying a Mooney or other higher performance airplane?

Regards,

Dan

Ernie,

I totally disagree with you. Hell, I’m almost rude enough to shout: “You don’t know what you’re talking about.” but I won’t. :slight_smile:

The SR22 can be a complex aircraft if one allows one to become overawed with all of the video game features onboard, but it flies like a dream.

It is far more gentle and forgiving than any taildragger I have ever flown. The p-factor is minimal, it is stable at low speeds, damn near impossible to spin, and it penetrates turbulence well.

Frankly, I would expect fossils who have 10,000hrs in citbrias, cubs, and cessna 15x’s to be in much more trouble than a newly minted 110hr pilot with recent training.

For all the bells and whistles, it’s just a damn good airplane. Fly the plane, play with the toys when it’s not stressful.

HEY PAUL EVERYONE TO THEIR OWN OPINION OK

MY STATEMENT IS SHARED BY ARTICLES IVE READ FROM HIGH TIME PILOTS THAT TEST FLEW THE SR20 A LOT SLOWER THAN THE 22 . IF INTERESTED ILL FAX YOU THESE. IVE FLOWN THE PLANE AND I AGREE WITH ALL STATEMENTS YOU MADE , BUT I STILL SAY SPEED MANAGEMENT AND JUDGEMENT CALLS YOU LEARN THROUGH EXPERIENCE ARE SOMETHING YOU NEED TO HAVE WHEN GOING TO A PLANE THAT HAS THE SR22 PERFORMANCE AND THE INSURANCE COMPANIES KNOW THIS THATS WHY TO THWM A 110 HR PILOT IN A HIGH PERFORMANCE SLICK AIRPLANE IS A HIGH RISK.OK

REGARDS ERNIE

I thinki Dan made an interesting observation about transitioning into a Mooney. Back when I was doing instrument instruction I gave most instruction to people who had their own (usually higher performance) airplanes. It was my experience that the more time the pilot had in C150/C172/PA-28 type aircraft the MORE difficult it was for them to transition to the faster, higher performance aircraft. The best were those who bought their aircraft (often an older Bonanza) and actually used it to get their private. Too much time in really low performance machines makes it difficult to adjust to thinking ahead. You can be sloppier in holding a heading in a 150 since you get off course much more slowly and correction is likewise easy. If you start early with higher performance aircraft you simply learn from the start to do what’s required. You quickly learn that a specific power setting and a specific attitude gives a specific flight profile. Using the gear, flaps and prop controls become second nature. (Of course in a Cirrus gear and prop are moot). I really believe that if economics allowed (and I know it doesn’t) it would be ideal to learn to fly in the type of aircraft you intend to use most often.

That’s why the military can train you from the street into the cockpit of a jet fighter in less time than it takes most people to get a commercial/instrument/instructor/multiengine rating in the civilian sector.

In spite of the insurance companies there is simply no reason that the average low time pilot can’t safely transition into a SR20/22 with minimal difficulty.

J. Seckler

The SR22 can be a complex aircraft if one allows one to become overawed with all of the video game features onboard, but it flies like a dream.

It is far more gentle and forgiving than any taildragger I have ever flown. The p-factor is minimal, it is stable at low speeds, damn near impossible to spin, and it penetrates turbulence well.

Frankly, I would expect fossils who have 10,000hrs in citbrias, cubs, and cessna 15x’s to be in much more trouble than a newly minted 110hr pilot with recent training.

For all the bells and whistles, it’s just a damn good airplane. Fly the plane, play with the toys when it’s not stressful.

HEY PAUL EVERYONE TO THEIR OWN OPINION OK

MY STATEMENT IS SHARED BY ARTICLES IVE READ FROM HIGH TIME PILOTS THAT TEST FLEW THE SR20 A LOT SLOWER THAN THE 22 . IF INTERESTED ILL FAX YOU THESE. IVE FLOWN THE PLANE AND I AGREE WITH ALL STATEMENTS YOU MADE , BUT I STILL SAY SPEED MANAGEMENT AND JUDGEMENT CALLS YOU LEARN THROUGH EXPERIENCE ARE SOMETHING YOU NEED TO HAVE WHEN GOING TO A PLANE THAT HAS THE SR22 PERFORMANCE AND THE INSURANCE COMPANIES KNOW THIS THATS WHY TO THWM A 110 HR PILOT IN A HIGH PERFORMANCE SLICK AIRPLANE IS A HIGH RISK.OK

REGARDS ERNIE