Tail Dragging

Have any of you experienced the problem of dragging the tail when landing? Our airplane is in a flying club and that problem has happened more that once.

The result has been damage to the tail tiedown and /or the skin around it. In all reported inciedents it’s ment loosing the tiedown hook.

I believe it may have to do with what speed the approach is made at. Anything less that 75 knots and the pilot tries to salvage the landing by flaring.

Have any of you experienced the problem of dragging the tail when landing? Our airplane is in a flying club and that problem has happened more that once.

The result has been damage to the tail tiedown and /or the skin around it. In all reported inciedents it’s ment loosing the tiedown hook.

I believe it may have to do with what speed the approach is made at. Anything less that 75 knots and the pilot tries to salvage the landing by flaring.
Darman,
Fortunately, I have not experienced any tail-strikes; I have been careful to avoid them, because during my Wings Aloft training in Duluth when my airplane was delivered, I was told that following any tail strike, the airplane should not be flown until the lower rudder hinge is inspected by an A&P, and found to be airworthy.

Apparently, the tie-down loop is mounted on the rudder hinge – there’s apparently not much else back there for it to be connected to.

I suggest that you verify this with Cirrus. If it were my airplane, I wouldn’t fly it without checking.

  • Mike.

Have any of you experienced the problem of dragging the tail when landing? Our airplane is in a flying club and that problem has happened more that once.

The result has been damage to the tail tiedown and /or the skin around it. In all reported inciedents it’s ment loosing the tiedown hook.

I believe it may have to do with what speed the approach is made at. Anything less that 75 knots and the pilot tries to salvage the landing by flaring.

As in a previous post the visual is like auguring in to the ground. Proper instruction as to the different visual approach and plenty of practice to stomp this big bug.

Have any of you experienced the problem of dragging the tail when landing? Our airplane is in a flying club and that problem has happened more that once.

The result has been damage to the tail tiedown and /or the skin around it. In all reported inciedents it’s ment loosing the tiedown hook.

I believe it may have to do with what speed the approach is made at. Anything less that 75 knots and the pilot tries to salvage the landing by flaring.

You can refer to this manuver as “Lack of training”…Ed

Another way to get a nose-high attitude is to have less than full flaps. It makes it much easier to drag the tail.

-Curt

this can be only chalked up as “pilot error”! 50 more ‘practice’ landings by the tail strikers is a must…

Have any of you experienced the problem of dragging the tail when landing? Our airplane is in a flying club and that problem has happened more that once.

The result has been damage to the tail tiedown and /or the skin around it. In all reported inciedents it’s ment loosing the tiedown hook.

I believe it may have to do with what speed the approach is made at. Anything less that 75 knots and the pilot tries to salvage the landing by flaring.

Darman,

Fortunately, I have not experienced any tail-strikes; I have been careful to avoid them, because during my Wings Aloft training in Duluth when my airplane was delivered, I was told that following any tail strike, the airplane should not be flown until the lower rudder hinge is inspected by an A&P, and found to be airworthy.

Apparently, the tie-down loop is mounted on the rudder hinge – there’s apparently not much else back there for it to be connected to.

I suggest that you verify this with Cirrus. If it were my airplane, I wouldn’t fly it without checking.

  • Mike.

Have any of you experienced the problem of dragging the tail when landing? Our airplane is >

Apparently, the tie-down loop is mounted on the rudder hinge – there’s apparently not much else back there for it to be connected to.

fyi

Actually the tiedown is bolted to a bulkhead the rearmost bulkhead.A 3/4 inch hole you see in the lower aft end is the spot.It’s not connected to the hinge as that would be suicide.I would really have the bulkhead checked and adhesive for cracks and such.The bulkhead is at fuselage station 305.Kinda an important piece to the fuselage as is carries alot of the torsional load.Who ever dragged the tail on a sr- was way off on their landing attitude and should not fly one again unless proper training is givin.You don’t hold it off like a standard airfoiled type ac.Ground the aircraft and have a thourough inspection. -j

Actually the tiedown is bolted to a bulkhead the rearmost bulkhead… The bulkhead is at fuselage station 305.

Thanks for the clarification. Just curious – my POH W&B section says that my Pitch Trim Cartridge Assembly is at station 310.9; I could be wrong on this, but from photos, it looks as though the tiedown is farther back than the pitch motor. Is it definitely at station 305?

  • Mike.

Thanks for the clarification. Just curious – my POH W&B section says that my Pitch Trim Cartridge Assembly is at station 310.9; I could be wrong on this, but from photos, it looks as though the tiedown is farther back than the pitch motor. Is it definitely at station 305?

  • Mike

I stand corrected.The tiedown in connected with the aft vertical spar where the lower hinge is also.The tiedown is aft of the 305 tiedown.I had to think for a second.I appoligize for the in correct statement.I would very definetly have that looked at as the hole for the tie is drilled through the lower vertical spar,and … well you know.Your lower hinge point is just above the mounting for the mount for the tiedown.It’s a strong design but have it looked at.I am not an engineer so take my statements with a grain of salt.Call and ask cirrus engineers for their thoughts on this as they know the bird/.

The tiedown is aft of the 305 tiedown.

Scratch this line to.No such thing as a 305 tiedown.I need my wheaties this morning. -j