CAPS and Leftys

Is it legal to remove the CAPS from the airframe if I don’t want it or is it somehow required for certification?

What about leftys flying from the right seat? It would be relativly easy for CD to mirror the panel and have a left handed version. Any comments?

Is it legal to remove the CAPS from the airframe if I don’t want it or is it somehow required for certification?

No, the CAPS was essential to certification (it obviated the need for full spin testing, and possibly other things).

What about leftys flying from the right seat? It would be relativly easy for CD to mirror the panel and have a left handed version.

My guess, based on Cirrus’ response to other questions, is that this would fall into the the category of “yes, it could be done, but there are other things that are a higher priority right now”.

A left-handed plane might have lower resale value, though.

Is it legal to remove the CAPS from the airframe if I don’t want it or is it somehow required for certification?

No, the CAPS was essential to certification (it obviated the need for full spin testing, and possibly other things).

Yes, if you make the airplane an experimental. Not too much problem there.

What about leftys flying from the right seat? It would be relativly easy for CD to mirror the panel and have a left handed version.

If you can pick your nose with either hand you wont have a problem. It is not like wearing the left shoe in your right foot.

My guess, based on Cirrus’ response to other questions, is that this would fall into the the category of “yes, it could be done, but there are other things that are a higher priority right now”.

A left-handed plane might have lower resale value, though.

If you can pick your nose with either hand you wont have a problem. It is not like wearing the left shoe in your right foot.

My guess, based on Cirrus’ response to other questions, is that this would fall into the the category of “yes, it could be done, but there are other things that are a higher priority right now”.

A left-handed plane might have lower resale value, though.

Hey, Hey, Let’s be nice here!. Being a lefty, and I consider myself coordinated enough to pick my nose, I am not thrilled about having to change hands when flying. Althought I fly almost exclusively with my left hand (righty style?) When I fly from the right seat and use my right hand (landing, take offs, etc.) I am uncomfortable. I intend to get a couple of hours in from the right seat with my initial training.
I aslo am very concerned about writing clearances,. Now, I just switch hands for the moment. With the SR20, I may have to activate the AP.

As for “mirroring” the panel. I think it might be a lot more work than one would think. Unfortunately, CD decided to truncate the panel (a la early Cessna 177’s). If not, I imaginge for a more reasonable(?) fee from any competant avionics shop, I imagine the instruments could be relocated.

If you can pick your nose with either hand you wont have a problem. It is not like wearing the left shoe in your right foot.

As a righty I may be biased (or-- groan! – insensitive), but I think this is a non-issue. Reason: the great majority of pilots who are right-handed had to go through an initial ambidextrous adjustment in learning to fly.

By extension from the rest of life, you’d assume that the yoke should belong to the dominant hand, since it must be controlled in a more varied and subtle way, with prop/power/flaps relegated to the pathetic “off” hand, since they’re simple slide or switch controls. But every righty soon learns to control the yoke with the left, and do power with the right. In the 99 per cent of flight time when you’re not copying clearances, the lefty is actually at an advantage, with his “good” hand on the yoke or stick. The one per cent is a problem for the lefty, but manageable (like a lot of other problems, such as opening charts) by flying with the feet, or trim, or the autopilot, or whatever.

My point in writing this: I view flying in general as a reminder of people’s underlying ambidextrousness. If the standard pilot’s seat had started out being on the right, and someone proposed changing it to the left now, righties would protest en masse about the error of forcing them to fly with their off hand.

With the hi tech we live in, Cirrus is a good example, how about using the little device that you can plug right into your headset wires to record the instructions, and you can play them back so you can write down at a better time.

I like what JF had to say previously about this subject. Do you know the story about the first keyboard (typewriter)? We do learn different things if we are put in a situation without a choice. SR26RG !?! :slight_smile: